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6 results for Carolina Gardener Vol. 29 Issue 3, April 2017
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Record #:
34807
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While most crabapple trees have a reputation for being too sour, there are several varieties to be found in North Carolina that are sweet. They are perfect for canning, cooking, pressing into cider and juice, or just eating right off the tree. They are very hardy trees, need little maintenance, and can yield hundreds of pounds of fruit per season.
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Record #:
34805
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Native gardens are becoming popular as their reputation for minimal upkeep spreads. In North Carolina, indigenous tree species, such as magnolias and southern live oaks, can co-exist with smaller varieties of flower, such as azaleas, hydrangea, and phlox. Moving to native species can cut down on the negative environmental impacts of invasive species.
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Record #:
34806
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As the population of North Carolina becomes more diverse, so too does the variety of greenery and vegetables in gardens all over the state. African and Asian varieties are especially popular, with the introduction of plants like bitter melon, bok choy, cassava, and rice.
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Record #:
34808
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A wide variety of pumpkins can be grown in the Carolinas. They need plenty of space, sun, water, and good soil in order to grow. This article gives tips and tricks to ensuring that your next pumpkin crop is healthy.
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Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 3, April 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36197
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To help draw the line between harmful or harmless insects is a description of ten, many which can be found in gardens. Harmless are pillbugs, common whitetail skimmer, bald faced hornet, and spiny back orb weaver. Destructive are harlequin bug, saddleback caterpillar, three lined potato beetle, wooly bear caterpillar, black carpenter and kudzu bug.
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Record #:
36198
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Abstract:
A lot of renovation work was invested in the transformation of a parking lot into a city park. Including elements such as a clock, type of tree imported from Italy, and Spartanburg County medallion map made the ten year venture a labor of love.
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