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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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1223 results for "North Carolina Historical Review"
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Record #:
34448
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Over the course of the 18th century, the native North Carolina Chowan population adopted European practices and sold their allocated reservation lands to conform and survive in the British colony. These actions led to their reclassification from “Indians” to “Colored People” by colonial officials, who also assumed there was a loss of cultural identity. Contemporary writers incorrectly believed the Chowans no longer existed as a political or cultural entity, however an examination of archival and oral histories indicates that the Chowan people have maintained their cultural identity. Furthermore, their colonial racial reclassification is indicative of attitudes towards race and identity formation in the 18th century.
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34449
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On December 24, 1864 the Union launched the largest American naval bombardment to date against forces at Fort Fisher in an attempt to seal the port of Wilmington. While successful in landing troops near the Fort, the expedition ultimately failed. Historically, Union General Benjamin Butler was blamed for the military failure. In the article, the author argues that it was not only Butler, but personal politics between Union commanders, that doomed their attempt to take Fort Fisher.
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34450
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North Carolina civil rights lawyer John Wheeler was an advocate for equal employment opportunity in government positions and the advancement of Black Americans. His work directly influenced national employment legislation, and Wheeler himself served on various state and national committees. Despite his involvement in national civil rights, Wheeler remains elusive in modern historical studies. This article discusses Wheeler’s background and career as a banker, lawyer, and civil rights advocate, emphasizing his contributions to the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity.
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34453
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Slaves and maroon communities were perceived as a threat to white property in Eastern North Carolina during the antebellum era. While slaves did have legal access to firearms during the colonial period, this access was revoked following the 1831 Nat Turner Rebellion in Virginia. This article discusses the use of black firearm laws as a means of protecting white property and mitigating the perceived black threat.
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34451
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Many of North Carolina’s 4-H programs remained racially segregated through the 1980s despite open membership policies and legislation. This article addresses four aspects of 4-H and race—organizational inequalities, white support of black members, black activism and advocacy, and eventual racial integration of 4-H clubs.
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34452
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In 1754, Captain Neil Campbell organized a singular voyage for Scottish immigrants looking to settle in the New World. This article discusses their emigration to the Cape Fear region and resulting settlement using historic records, maps, and written histories.
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23931
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During the age of Jim Crow, African Americans were denied access to shared public places, including leisure spaces. This article examines the establishment of Hammocks Beach as a blacks-only beach, while simultaneously highlighting the larger African American struggle for social freedom in North Carolina and challenging the progressive image of the state regarding integration.
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23930
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In 1784, the state of North Carolina offered to cede the land from the North Carolina-Virginia border to Georgia, and from the Appalachian mountains to the Mississippi River and form a new state called \"Franklin.\" The article examines the intentions of those urging for Franklin's establishment and the nature of government and politics in post-Revolutionary North America.
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Record #:
23939
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From 1966 to 1978, the North Carolina General Assembly debated allowing counties and municipalities to vote on the sale of liquor-by-the-drink. Charlotte and Mecklenburg County became the center of the conflict, for while the city wanted to attract corporate headquarters from the financial and computer sector, many religious leaders organized grass-roots support to oppose the legalization of mixed-drink sales.
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Record #:
24802
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In the summer of 1946, Franklin, North Carolina residents came together to save the sacred Cherokee “Mother Town” of Nikwasi, located in Franklin. History student, Nathaniel F. Holly agrues that although the Franklinites relied on their ideas of the “vanishing Indian” as support for their cause, ultimately, their efforts assisted with the disappearance of these Amerindians. However, the Cherokee Indians never disappeared from the Franklin area and their presence now forces Franklinites to consider the irony of this preservation effort.
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24804
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Blackbeard is one of the most famous pirates in history, but much of his past is shrouded in mystery. History student and author, Baylus Brooks argues that contrary to popular belief, Blackbeard was not a ruthless pirate, but rather his actions were much milder than previously thought. He reveals new information about the identity of Blackbeard, his genealogical history, and his motivations for acts of piracy.
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24803
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Prisoner exchanges were a common part of military strategy during the Civil War. In 1864, Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant halted prisoner exchanges in an attempt to subdue the South, but in 1865, allowed prisoner transactions to resume. Wilmington, North Carolina was chosen as the site to release Union prisoners. History professor and author, Chris Fonvielle, addresses a number of questions about this exchange, including why Wilmington was chosen site and what the North Carolina public and political response was to the prisoner exchange.
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Record #:
24873
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Between the end of royal government and the creation of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina, local committees of safety assumed roles of provisional governance. When other locals disagreed with or criticized the actions taken by the new committees, serious consequences could occur. One example is provided by the response taken in New Hanover County by the Wilmington Safety Committee to the so-called “Musquetoe,” a scandalous set of hand-drawn and privately circulated caricatures of members of safety committees in the Lower Cape Fear.
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24872
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When Frederick Law Olmsted went to meticulous lengths when designing the grounds for the Biltmore estate. This included everything from the placement of plants, structures, and roads to the kinds of flora that would be planted and the negotiations to get everything the way he pictured it.
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Record #:
22578
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In February 1971, Wilmington, North Carolina endured racially-charged violence that led to the trial of nine black males and one white female for crimes of arson and shooting. The 'Wilmington Ten' were sentenced to a combined 282 years in prison. Forty years later, North Carolina governor Beverly Perdue pardoned the group due to outrageous conduct and misappropriation of justice from the state in the 1970s.