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Record #:
8978
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SNAP DRAGON was a two-topsail schooner used by privateer Otway Burns during the War of 1812. Captured in 1814, there is no American information as to what happened to the ship after its capture. British records show it was bought at auction and sailed to Jamaica in 1815. The final entry says she left Jamaica in 1816, and the trail of the schooner ends there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 6, Nov 1980, p12-14, il
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Record #:
14341
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two hundred years ago, a fleet of Spanish privateers entered the Beaufort harbor and seized and held the town for several weeks. So far as is known, Beaufort is the only North Carolina town over which the Spanish flag has flown.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Aug 1947, p5
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Record #:
15104
Abstract:
Over two hundred years ago, Duncan King, one of North Carolina's contributions to the then popular vocation of privateering, was roving the seas, sailing under the British flag and fighting for Great Britain. A native of Scotland, King chose North Carolina as his home and operated from there. Captain of a privateer, an officer under General Wolf at the Battle of Quebec, and a millionaire, King now lies buried in a forest in Columbus County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 33, Jan 1941, p11, 22, f
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Record #:
9757
Author(s):
Abstract:
Otway Burns was born near Swansboro in 1775, and began his sailing career as a young man. He was North Carolina�s and the South's most famous and successful privateer of the War of 1812. Sailing aboard the SNAP DRAGON, he captured almost 40 ships with cargoes totaling millions of dollars. His ship was frequently outgunned, however, Burns' outstanding seamanship was more than a match for a superior foe. Although Otway Burns died an obscure pauper, he holds today an honored place in the state's maritime history.
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