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11 results for Burns, Otway, 1775-1850
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Record #:
2075
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Abstract:
Burnsville, named for privateer Captain Otway Burns, is the seat of Yancey County. The changing seasons and variety of activities draw many tourists who appreciate the slow mountain pace.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 8, Jan 1995, p12, il
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Record #:
8077
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During the War of 1812, 1,607 British vessels were captured. Of this number, ninety-six were brought to nine North Carolina ports. Wilmington had the most with thirty-six, followed by Portsmouth and Beaufort. Otway Burns, captain of the SNAP DRAGON, brought in forty-two vessels and over 300 English prisoners. These ships and their cargoes were valued at more than $4 million. Blades lists each captured ship, who captured it, and the North Carolina port where it was taken.
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Record #:
13979
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Captain Otway Burns was a bold seafarer and a feared privateer during the War of 1812. In later years, he became one of the state's most courageous legislators.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 38, Feb 1951, p6-7, 17, f
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Record #:
15087
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Captain Burns was a notorious figure during the War of 1812 because of his raids on British shipping. Republicans supported the conflict and viewed Burns as a national hero, while Federalists defied the war and felt Burs was nothing more than a marauding pirate. Following war, Captain Otway Burns returned to his native North Carolina to become an active member of both State House and Senate from 1821-1834 representing Carteret County.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 13, Aug 1941, p12, 25
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Record #:
24530
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North Carolina’s first steamboat, PROMETHEUS (ship), was built in Swansboro by Captain Otway Burns (1775-1850), a Privateer hero of the War of 1812.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 6, November 1977, p8-10, il
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Record #:
24636
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Abstract:
An old burying ground at Beaufort has been in use since the early 1700s and sheds light on the history of the area. The grave is the final resting place of such historical figures as Col. William Thompson (1736-1781) and Captain Otway Burns (1775-1850).
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 18, February 1959, p11, 20, il
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Record #:
9757
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Abstract:
Otway Burns was born near Swansboro in 1775, and began his sailing career as a young man. He was North Carolina�s and the South's most famous and successful privateer of the War of 1812. Sailing aboard the SNAP DRAGON, he captured almost 40 ships with cargoes totaling millions of dollars. His ship was frequently outgunned, however, Burns' outstanding seamanship was more than a match for a superior foe. Although Otway Burns died an obscure pauper, he holds today an honored place in the state's maritime history.
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Record #:
34651
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Abstract:
The War of 1812, while often forgotten, was significant for the United States as it challenged Great Britain’s maritime supremacy and established the right for all nations to use American waterways for international commerce. Otway Burns, a merchant Captain from Swansboro, North Carolina, served as a privateer during the War of 1812. Over the course of the War, Burns captured 42 English vessels and took 300 British citizens prisoner. Such acts supported the burgeoning U.S. Navy by removing the British threat to maritime commerce. Following the war, Burns adopted shipbuilding and built the first North Carolinian steam vessel.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p4-6, il
Record #:
34675
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawing on oral histories passed down through his family, this author presents an alternative history of North Carolinian privateer Otway Burns. The author’s grandfather recalled that Beaufort residents were terrified of Burns during the early 19th century. Following the disappearance of Theodosia Burr’s schooner off the North Carolina coast in 1812, the crew of SNAP DRAGON, Otway Burn’s vessel, came to Beaufort wearing clothes supposedly taken from Burr. Residents believed SNAP DRAGON had attacked Burr’s vessel in an act of piracy. The author reports residents remained wary of Burns and, following his death, chose to bury Burns outside of town.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 18 Issue 2, Winter 2002, p11-14, il, por
Record #:
38149
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Abstract:
Burnsville’s identity is defined by more than a nineteenth century privateer. As much as nearby Mount Mitchell State Park, town square festivals, and local businesses, Burnsville is defined by art. As noted by the author, the art is around downtown, in Toe River Studio and EnergyXchange, and at a glass blower’s Quonset hut. Perhaps not surprising: the 500 artists residing in Yancey County give it one of the greatest concentration of artists in the country.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 2, July 2013, p36-38, 40, 42-46 Periodical Website
Record #:
39567
Author(s):
Abstract:
He was a seaman on the Privateer Snap Dragon in the War of 1812.
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