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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Recycling
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Record #:
36577
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This nonprofit organization, offering bicycles at affordable prices and the opportunity to learn how to repair and build a bicycle. With bicycle parts donated and business operated by volunteers, Asheville ReCyclery offers more than relatively affordable transportation to school or work. It means helping others improve their lives while contributing to a sense of community.
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36453
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The newly created office aimed to assure its sustained place by playing a role in sustaining the environment. Two years later, post-implementation of its Sustainability Management Plan, the department had lived up to its promise of sustainability. The city, partnering with local environmental groups, had reduced its carbon footprint by nearly thirty percent, through eco-friendly practices related to fuel, electricity, water system improvement, and recycling.
Record #:
38295
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The career Marc Basnight devotes himself currently was protecting the shores of Shallowbag Bay and the surrounding land his family had called home for three centuries. Political initiatives spearheaded during his years in the Senate included the passage of a plastic bag ban on the Outer Banks. Environmental initiatives created post-career in Washington making preservation possible included the Natural Heritage Trust Fund and the recycling part of his restaurant’s operation that reduces his carbon footprint.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 12, May 2011, p160-162, 164, 166 Periodical Website
Record #:
12513
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Started in 1986, the Carolinas Glass Recycling Program seeks to reduce the number of jars and bottles going into landfills each year. The program has the support of five glass manufacturing firms in the Carolinas that are investing $1 million in promotions, services and marketing support for recycling companies and organizations. The companies have also increased the amount of money they pay for recycled glass.
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Record #:
26508
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North Carolina legislature set a goal to recycle 25 percent of the total waste stream. New technologies are helping to make recycling a more viable alternative to waste disposal, but there is still debate over costs. Industries see recycling as a potential for profit, but local municipalities see it as an expense.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
28819
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From social injustice to environmental damage, local designers in North Carolina are trying to make the world a better place. Local clothing companies, from Liberation Threads to TS Designs, highlight the environmental, ethical, and cultural arguments for local materials, production, and distribution in their mission statements.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 46, Nov 2016, p30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
40635
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One of Cecil Staton’s accomplishments during his chancellorship was implementing a plan to transform East Carolina University into a campus that advocates ecological sustainability. The plan, to be implemented between 2017-2022, contains these initiatives in the areas of climate change mitigation, academics and research, campus grounds, and materials management.
Record #:
37165
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With the same theme as another article found in this edition, Susan Stafford Kelly' “Diamond Guys," this article profiles fifteen businesses in North Carolina owned by the same families. Included were Raleigh’s York Properties, established 1910; Hickory’s Keever’s Key and Repair Service, founded 1920; Salisbury’s Beaver Brothers, established 1911; Windsor’s Bertie County Peanuts, founded 1915.
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Record #:
36558
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For homeowners, renters, and business owners wanting a healthier and eco-friendly interior environment, Green Gauge, created by the Western North Carolina Building Council, can fulfill both goals. Actions recommended: use energy and water usage wisely, improve indoor air quality, and use sustainable building and landscaping materials. Benefits include lower utility bills, a reduction of carbon footprint, and increased home value.
Record #:
26593
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Recycling is becoming more convenient and efficient for consumers in North Carolina. Municipal curbside programs have been started and there is interest of the private sector in creating markets.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1989, p8-10, il
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Record #:
36191
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Reuse, recycle, and renew are buzz words generated by the ongoing environmental crisis. Ways wine bottles can be used after the party ends are ecologically conscious, creative, and practical. Uses included plant labels, row covers securers, and floral wreath additions.
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Record #:
41096
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Four initiatives yielded for William David the 2019 Young Eco-Hero Award: recycling hard to recycle items; Eastern box turtle conservation; invasive species prevention; and French Broad watershed water quality project. Information pointing to his potential and promising a future in conservation: a mentor from the NC Arboretum; career plans involving engineering.
Record #:
18430
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One paradox of our time is that we are simultaneously running out of natural resources and running out of space for disposing of discarded materials made from those resources. In addition, the price of those resources is constantly rising. As a result, very many people and communities are interested in saving both money and landfill space by recycling as much disposable material as possible. In North Carolina many organizations and communities have recycling programs and are working toward that goal.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 50 Issue 4, Spring 1985, p23-28
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Record #:
15929
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Many types of plastics are now recyclable. In North Carolina, Southeastern Container is giving assistance to smaller communities wishing to move toward recycling activities.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 1989, p11-13, f
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Record #:
40790
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Recycling realities include penalties imposed if too much trash is mixed in and steps involved with separating what’s recyclable and not. Educating the public about the difference, and sparing facilities like ECVC penalties, includes a list in this article of what’s recyclable and not.
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