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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for "Fishing communities "
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Record #:
40009
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Abstract:
Organizations interested in becoming better caretakers to North Carolina’s 1700 watersheds created the North Carolina Watershed Stewardship Network. In addition to workshops, the Network has engaged in initiatives such as obtaining feedback from communities about research, education, and training support needed to resolve water-resource issues. Also affirming the Network’s necessity was water-related stories shared by the North Carolina Sea Grant staff and friends, told in words and photos.
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Record #:
39723
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Retired fisherman Neal “Nicky” Harvey was inspired to put his crab pots to another good use: as foundation for artificial Christmas trees. This decoration is perhaps something only an individual from a fishing village could have created. Sold to a Smyrna businessman and revamped as an online venture, this Carteret County native’s merchandise has found appeal the world over, from countries such as Japan.
Record #:
40415
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A day in the life account reveals how native commercial fishermen help to incrementally increase the amount of local seafood sold in restaurants across North Carolina and keep the "sea to table" food trend viable.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 87 Issue 1, June 2019, p108-112, 114-115 Periodical Website
Record #:
39970
Abstract:
Like "farm to table," "sea to table" encourages restaurants and their distributors to obtain food from local producers and harvesters. Slowing this trend's momentum are impediments such as harvest regulations and an underdeveloped supply chain. The author's evidence that overcoming such barriers is worthwhile includes national market research. It asserts that people, when offered the option, would rather have locally grown or harvested foods.
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Record #:
38300
Abstract:
The stories of three Eastern North Carolinians help explains how Eastern North Carolinians endure challenges threatening a way of life sustaining them for four centuries. In recounting the lives of individuals from Atlantic, Frisco, and Beaufort, Garrity-Blake also explains her enduring passion for helping to preserve this way of life. Also attesting this passion are activities like her compilation of oral histories for the National Park Service’s study of Outer Banks villages and co-authoring Fish House Opera.
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