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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission
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Record #:
41131
Author(s):
Abstract:
Factors threatening the Lake Sturgeon’s survival in North Carolina waterways include overharvesting and habitat degradation. The described approach is a response to the population crisis that places them in the species of special concern category. It begins with care in living tanks and food specially prepared by staff. It ends with the fishes' release, once they have acclimated to provisions resembling prey inhabiting the state's wild waters.
Record #:
41149
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Network for Endangered Sea Turtles’ wildlife conservation efforts complement work carried out by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. Made up of volunteers and professionals, they contribute to the survival of coastal creatures such as sea turtles. The five species profiled include the Loggerhead, comprising 95% of this state's sea turtle population.
Record #:
41144
Author(s):
Abstract:
Coastal Plain places perhaps considered uninhabitable by many have become a new home to Wood Stork. On the endangered species list since 1984, the only native stork in America has four nesting colonies in North Carolina in which to replenish its populations, such as the pictured one in Columbus County and described one within a Carolina bay near Lumberton.
Record #:
41143
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the NC Wildlife Commission proves each spring, burning land can improve the quality of life in the wild. This carefully monitored practice replenishes nutrients needed by the plants, mammals, and insects in the burn blocks. Included in the day in the life style section of the article is the crew and equipment that carry out this conservation work.
Record #:
41151
Abstract:
Related to an earlier study co-published by Gerwin, the author's current study involved private lands used for wildlife conservation efforts. This study measured the success of endangered bird population preservation in statistics such as fledgling young return rate. Preparing lands like the Lassiter Mills tract for habitation included activities such as attaching GPS data recorders to birds like the pictured field sparrow.
Record #:
41155
Author(s):
Abstract:
Taking stock of a practice existing in North Carolina since the 1880s included addressing actions associated with the modern version of hatchery-raised trout. They included trout types, hatchery locations, and why the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission regards triploid trout viable.