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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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31 results for "Animal lore"
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Record #:
35252
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is the analysis of symbolism and folklore in the novel “The Track of the Cat.” The novel contains elements of animal symbolism, good versus evil, fear of the unknown, gender stereotypes, and death.
Record #:
35267
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This is an excerpt from the newspaper Raleigh News and Observer about some superstitions regarding love and marriage.
Record #:
35272
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Three stories that feature snakes as the subject matter; “Tenderhearted Little Girl,” “Down in the Basement,” and “The Snake Hunter.”
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Record #:
35370
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In the Aarne-Thompson index, Tale Type 62 refers to “Peace among the Animals-the Fox and the Cock.” The opening story is a variation of that type, and the author continues on to analyze similar variations.
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Record #:
35379
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A tale about a patient buzzard and an impatient hawk is the basis for the author’s analysis of story variations. It is a companion article to one published in the previous issue, titled “The Fox and the Goose.”
Record #:
35530
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The tale about an incredibly tough to kill hog, and the similarities it poses to a story by William Faulkner.
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Record #:
35670
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A collection of stories from teenage boys about ghosts, haunted houses, murder, and more.
Record #:
35722
Abstract:
In the novel “The Wedding Guest,” author Ovid Pierce included many different folkways, including proverbs, folk beliefs, animal lore, ghosts, and more.
Record #:
35721
Author(s):
Abstract:
Throughout folklore, frogs are often associated with rain and one particular family that now lives in Columbus, Ohio, believe that frogs come to the earth via rain.
Record #:
35735
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Abstract:
Finding his work horse sufficiently tired each morning for a couple days, a farmer sat outside at night to try to catch the person riding his horse. To his fright, he felt the presence of a witch instead.
Record #:
36890
Author(s):
Abstract:
Drawn from the oral culture of the southern mountains, a catalogue of folklore creatures with a description and some illustrations comprises most of this article.
Record #:
35275
Author(s):
Abstract:
A list of 15 superstitions relating to children, weather, love/marriage, and death.
Record #:
37820
Author(s):
Abstract:
A few tidbits about snake folklore, ducks, a fishing story, and a tool used for removing fishing hooks.