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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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37 results for "Rumley, Vail Stewart"
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Record #:
41279
Abstract:
The Elmwood 1820’s long history in the community includes serving as a hospital during the Civil War. This plantation had housed just seven families before its transformation into a bed and breakfast in 2015. Today, it is a repository for local history, represented in Elmwood-related memorabilia the current owners are collecting for its 200th anniversary.
Record #:
36149
Abstract:
A former vaudeville theater located upstairs in Washington's Turnage Theater may be one of the best of its kind still in existence according Emily Rebert, the City of Washington's community development planner and also master's candidate at Savannah College of Art and Design. It is hoped Rebert's work will lead to funding opportunities for restoration.
Record #:
37380
Abstract:
The North Carolina Estuarium educates schoolchildren across North Carolina and visitors from around the globe about aquatic life in the Albemarle-Pamlico estuarine system. Its curriculum includes interactive exhibits, topics such as the biology of the blue crab and a lesson in sculpture, pictured, showing how the food chain works. This miracle on many levels has been possible since 1998 through the collaboration of donors, volunteers, elected officials, board members, and the parent organization Partnership for the Sounds.
Record #:
40661
Abstract:
The Historic Bath Garden Club recreates the twelve days of Christmas, 18th-century style, at historic sites such as the Bonner House and Palmer Marsh House. This event highlights those citizens' version of the season, such as sparser decorations, plus a greater emphasis on companionship and January 6th.
Record #:
37320
Abstract:
In the area of Washington formerly known as “Pungo Town,” the Federal Style residence built by two brothers has changed little since its construction in 1795. Passed down to members of the Marsh family until 1942, a relative of former owners restored the house to National Trust preservation guidelines as part of her master’s thesis. The Congletons continue the architectural integrity tradition for the residence whose housing history includes Union officers during the Civil War.
Record #:
34403
Abstract:
The Washington Garden Club meets once a month to share their gardening experiences and ideas with one another. Organized by women in 1941, it became a federated club, National Garden Club, and the Garden Club of North Carolina, Inc., and is now a very strong and active organization. Each May, they host a plant sale at the North Carolina Estuarium, with proceeds supporting the club’s gardens at the Market and Gladden street intersection.
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Record #:
37305
Abstract:
A common Southern tradition became personal through intergenerational bonding happening while the Boyd family prepared hog meat for various dishes. Bonding between neighbors at what Doug Boyd called “The Village of Yesteryear,” a collection of buildings where the activity took place, is what made a common activity a builder of community.
Record #:
37370
Abstract:
Getting to Portsmouth Island is a challenge but the journey is worth the effort, according to the author. Among the perks Portsmouth has to offer is an environment that may make one feel as if a trip has been taken back in time. Reason noted by Rumley for this feeling: Portsmouth’s population has dwindled to summer tourists and fishermen; the place hasn’t changed much since its Colonial beginnings.
Record #:
37358
Abstract:
Historic Hope Foundation’s open house opens a door into the past of this house in Windsor. Also opening the door to Bertie’s County Colonial past is King-Bazemore House, moved on site from a few miles away. Described by the author as self-contained, Hope Plantation functioned through its own water powered grist mill, saw mill, blacksmith shop, blacksmith’s and cooper’s shops, and buildings for weaving and spinning. King-Bazemore’s “hall and parlor” design was common in dwellings from this era and its furnishings design is based on William King’s 1778 inventory.
Record #:
36167
Abstract:
The connection between a well known area of the Outer Banks and Beaufort County's capital was created physically. For many decades, ferries like the Bessie Virginia transported good between “Little Washington” and area known for its connection to Roanoke’s lost colony. It was also created emotionally, in the bonds between people interdependent on each other for survival.
Record #:
28785
Abstract:
Bath Creek Stables is an educational facility where children can learn to ride, learn animal husbandry, and responsibility. The successful stable owned by the Preston family is a place where the Beaufort County 4-H students can practice what they learn. The stable and its place in the local community are profiled.
Record #:
28784
Abstract:
A photojournal explores the history of Washington, NC through its architecture, landmarks, and notable artifacts. The Civil War bell at the First Presbyterian church, the Buckman’s Department Store Elevator, the Vaudeville Theater at Turnage Theatre, and the Old Courthouse are a few of the items and places highlighted for their history.
Record #:
24772
Abstract:
During World War II, Beaufort County began broadcasting US news and information to countries in South America, Central America, and Africa through the Voice of America radio station. Voice of America was an important way to communicate to these other countries during the war and especially during the 1950s, gaining it national renown. The station continued to operate with sites in both Beaufort and Pitt Counties until 2006 when the signal permanently went down.
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Record #:
26916
Abstract:
In May 2016, Bath celebrated 300 years of seaport history. In 1716, England’s Lords Proprietors designated Bath as an official seaport, paving the way for hundreds of years of history. Although the town is no longer a busy port, it still celebrated its history with reenactments and costumed interpreters.
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Record #:
23850
Abstract:
The Hackney family has been in the transportation business in some capacity since the fourteenth century. The family and a version of their company originated in England, but the family's activities in eastern North Carolina are the focus of this article. Hackney Brothers Inc. in Wilson is the focus of this article. Hackney Brothers Inc. in Wilson once dominated the bugging making industry. In the twentieth century, the Washington branch, Hackney and Sons, Inc. made its mark with delivery vehicles. The company now specializes in the manufacture of fire and rescue trucks.
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