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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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Record #:
30138
Author(s):
Abstract:
With employment rates and incomes on the rise, it is expected that North Carolina will provide more un-manufactured tobacco for cigarettes than in previous years. Along with export demands for tobacco to foreign countries, there is a foreign and domestic demand for cotton continues to be increase while supplies remain steady if not slightly smaller than previous years. Although there has been an increase in hatcheries for November, boiler prices have led to a decrease in demand for baby chicks. And North Carolina's hog crop is estimated to increase 4% over last year, a 14% increase above the 10 year average.
Record #:
30248
Author(s):
Abstract:
Going into its second summer, the fast-moving production of 'Horn in the West' is winning praises as a leading attraction in the western North Carolina mountains. Played nightly at the Daniel Boone Theatre, the drama tells the story of people and events on the Southern Appalachian frontier in the 1770s.
Record #:
30922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite a short, down trend blip in January, February 1959 employment turned upward and reached over 845,000 by March. The monthly record set a high, with a 4.6 percent increase above the first quarter of 1958. If this is an indicator of the climate, then there should be a record all-time high before then end of the year.
Record #:
30888
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Highway Commission was authorized to spend over $197 million for maintenance and construction of highways in the state during the next biennium ending in 1961. This amounted to a 2.3% increase from the previous year. Salary increases and administrative costs, along with other non-highway projects such as the state prison management, will take up a bulk of the revenue earned from gasoline, motor, and other taxes.
Record #:
30972
Author(s):
Abstract:
The average residential customer of Duke Power Company used more than 40 percent more electricity in 1959 than customers across the nation. Duke, a leading power system in the United States, increased its 12.5 billion killowatt hour product in 1958 to 13.8 billion in 1959. But despite major construction and additional services, rates have been reduced to make the advantages of electrical service available to all.
Record #:
31052
Author(s):
Abstract:
Similar to previous years, there is a remarkable agreement among forecasters as to the general direction of business activity for the coming year. The consensus is that 1962 will be a good year despite many overhanging economic problems. Many agree that 1962 has a potential to be substantially better than the previous year, but very few see the possibility of a super boom or speculative excess.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
25935
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Legislature approved funds for state parks and an increased anti-pollution enforcement. The only environmental legislation not passed was an animal waste bill that was but to a study committee to be reviewed the following year.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Summer 1973, p7
Record #:
25983
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina adopted some new legislation regarding hunting in 1975-76. Due to an increase in the deer population, NC hunters will not be able to shoot up to four in the eastern counties. The new regulations also updated the gun season for deer in certain counties between one and two weeks, while closing the season in other counties. Bow and arrow season for deer was shortened to three days. The regulations also tackled seasons for rabbit trapping, bobcats, and migratory birds.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p11
Subject(s):
Record #:
26094
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eastern North Carolina led the state in the number of arrests for illegal night hunting of deer, a violation of the State’s game laws.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 3, Summer 1977, p3
Subject(s):
Record #:
33482
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina legislature is expected to take action on legislation concerning use of phosphate detergent, low-level radioactive waste disposal, hazardous chemical waste treatment and hazardous waste orphan site cleanup, leaking underground storage tanks, landfill regulation, and pesticide contamination.
Record #:
34201
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1991-92 Green Index, issued by the Institute for Southern Studies of Durham, ranks North Carolina’s environmental conditions and policies slightly above average when compared to other states. The Green Index is a set of 256 indicators that measure and rank conditions of environmental health.
Record #:
25966
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two North Carolina men were among five arrested by federal agents in New Orleans. The men were charged with having American Alligator skins which violates the Endangered Species Act.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 18 Issue 5, Nov-Dec 1974, p17
Record #:
31226
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1943 and 1962, wages in North Carolina have gone up considerably, as well as the number of people employed. In 1943, the total payroll was over $806 million, but in 1962 the payroll was well over $3 billion. Additionally, due to the increase in employs in the state, more taxes paid by employers are added to the state tax reserve for unemployment benefits.
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Record #:
5909
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Gertrude S. Carraway Award of Merit recognizes organizations and individuals demonstrating strong commitment to promotion of historic preservation. The 2002 winners include Saint Anne Catholic Church in Scotland Neck, Sidney Halma of Catawba County, and Merlyn Macon of Franklin County.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 123, Spring 2003, p14-17, il
Record #:
7797
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Gertrude S. Carraway Award of Merit recognizes organizations and individuals demonstrating strong commitment to promotion of historical preservation. Among the 2005 winners were the town of Woodville for preservation of the 1847 St. Francis Methodist Church and Hank and Diane Parfitt for their rehabilitation of Fayetteville's 19th century Rat Building.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 129, Spring 2006, p16-17, il