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70 results for "Markovich, Jeremy"
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Record #:
21819
Abstract:
The Toe River Valley in Marshall and Yancey counties is a hotbed for the arts. The population of the two counties is around 30,000 and of that number it is estimated that more than 500 are artists--one of the highest concentrations of artists in the world. Markovich states there are two reasons for this--Harvey Littleton and the Penland School of Crafts at Spruce Pine. Littleton, who came to Spruce Pine in 1977, gained recognition first as a ceramist and later as a glassblower and sculptor in glass. Penland, founded in 1929 by Lucy Morgan, has gained world-wide recognition as a destination for artists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p132-136, 138, 140-142, 144, 146, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24967
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Jeremy Markovich describes the similarities he sees between Charlotte, NC and his native Ohio. Both regions have seen staple industries go bust with extensive job displacement and dislocation of families.
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Record #:
24914
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Jeremy Markovich explains why there is no need to be sad or upset every time a building is torn down in Charlotte. The way he sees it, they’re not tearing down history, they’re tearing down old and outdated buildings that are hard to miss once something nicer has replaced it.
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Record #:
27286
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Located in Henderson County, Hendersonville thrives off of the success of nearby Asheville. Hendersonville offers a number of attractions, including an aquarium, over 30 non-chain restaurants, amazing views, and mountain charm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p130-134, 136, 138, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
16571
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Highlands, located in Macon County, is featured in OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the sights to see are the Old Edwards Inn and Spa, Ugly Dog Pub, Highlands Nature Center, the Waterfalls, the Highlands Inn, the Highlands Hill Deli, and the Mountain Fresh Grocery.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 11, Apr 2012, p40-44, 46-48, 50, 52-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
36959
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A companion to “Hole in the Wall Joints: Tried and True,” this article profiled nine restaurants located in towns stretching from the coast to the mountains and whose menus range from seafood to snacks. Local spots that became the hearts of their towns included Waterfront Seafood Shack, Kitty Hawk; Allen and Son, Chapel Hill; and Dots Dario, Marion.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 3, August 2017, p90-94, 96, 98, 100-102, 104, 106, 108, 110-114 Periodical Website
Record #:
27822
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The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company was a prominent economic component and employer in Winston Salem during the twentieth century. The company headquarters building—built in the late 1920s—was iconic, and the inspiration for the Empire State Building. Following the decline of the tobacco industry, the building wasn’t used, but today, the inside has been refurbished as a hotel.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p86-90, 92, 94, 96, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27404
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Marshall Rauch, a 93 year old Jewish man from Gastonia, was the biggest producer of Christmas ornaments in the world from 1962-1995. He also served in the North Carolina Senate from 1967-1998. He is still quite busy as an investor, and has lived quite a charitable life.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 7, December 2016, p106-112, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28548
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The reemergence of the 1864 Agnes E. Fry shipwreck and its importance are detailed. The Agnes E. Fry was a blockade runner intended to be used to evade Union warships during the Civil War. The Fry’s history, the account of its final run as told by Bernard Roux Harding, and its place off the NC coast are described. Billy Ray Morris, director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch, rediscovered the ship and he describes the work being done to preserve and document the find.
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Record #:
34899
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The Agnes Fry shipwreck was recently found near the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The Agnes Fry had a long career as a Confederate blockade runner during the American Civil War. Billy Ray Morris, director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch of North Carolina, has been able to identify it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2017, p136-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
20131
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Leon Levine built a Fortune 500 company from the basement of a bargain shop in Charlotte; today, Family Dollar Stores occur in 45 states with over 7,500 stores. But Levin's legacy goes beyond the low-priced empire, donating millions to community and research centers, museums, and hospitals.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 3, Aug 2013, p44-46, 48, 50, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
23532
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Charlotte basketball fans fight to change the Bobcats back to the Hornets.
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Record #:
22679
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In 1987, the Charlotte Hornets were introduced by Kannapolis resident George Shinn. The Hornets were well received and loved by the city until 1999 when Shinn's controversies set unwanted light on the team. Shinn moved his team to New Orleans in 2012 and investment in the Charlotte Bobcats has been difficult. To add fuel to the fire is the worst season in NBA history, and now, a group of fans is calling for the Charlotte Bobcats to return to their original name of Charlotte Hornets.
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Record #:
23533
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Charlotte basketball fans fight to change the Bobcats back to the Hornets.
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Record #:
21669
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Joe and Peggy Swicegood have operated Little Pigs BBQ in Asheville for over fifty years. It began as part of the Little Pigs BBQ of America franchises, but by 1967, the chain was bankrupt. However, Joe and Peggy just kept right on going with their restaurant. Generally barbecue was too hard to do in a fast-food restaurant. McDonald's had tried but soon switched to hamburgers. Joe and Peggy had have a successful run, for as Joe says, \"If the food is good, the slaw is tasty, the place is clean, and the people are treated right, they'll come back.\"
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 10, Mar 2014, p51-52, 54, il, por Periodical Website
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