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8 results for Winston-Salem--History
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Record #:
12692
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Abstract:
The Moravians carried their distinctive traditions into the 19th century, founding a mission for the Cherokee Indians, as well as a Female Mission Society to work closely among slaves. Although their traditions continued, changes occurred including the possession of slaves, and the annex of Wachovia lands into the county seat of Forsyth. This last change touched off an uproar in Salem, bringing the brethren into close contact with progressive influences.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept 1961, p31-32, por
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Record #:
13511
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Peace has not always rested on Winston-Salem and Forsyth. Political, social, and economic fights have left scars on sensitive memories, if not on history.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 35, Jan 1954, p9-11
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Record #:
20963
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This article is a reprint of an address given to members of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association by then ambassador from Great Britain to the United States Sir Patrick Henry Dean. He discusses some history of the Winston-Salem area in honor of its bicentennial, and then provides an update on the current state of the relationship between Britain and the United States.
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Record #:
20959
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This article looks at the history of Winston-Salem and the Moravian Community's contribution to the state since its establishment.
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Record #:
21166
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North Carolina native Joseph Winston, for whom Winston-Salem is named, was an important leader of the Revolutionary war and politician of early America. Thrice elected to Congress, Winston was a liberal humanitarian and a well-respected Jeffersonian who was against a standing military and for a limited government.
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Record #:
27822
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The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company was a prominent economic component and employer in Winston Salem during the twentieth century. The company headquarters building—built in the late 1920s—was iconic, and the inspiration for the Empire State Building. Following the decline of the tobacco industry, the building wasn’t used, but today, the inside has been refurbished as a hotel.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 10, March 2017, p86-90, 92, 94, 96, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
33113
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem has achieved national recognition for its quality of life, due to the city’s “first families” or the corporate citizens who built successful industries. With a strong economic development program now in full gear, Winston-Salem continues to implement a policy for planned growth. This article covers the history of Winston-Salem’s accomplishments and discusses current efforts to broaden the city’s economic and political base.
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Record #:
38296
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Abstract:
The highway as North Carolina’s colonists knew it was the primary pathway for many. Covering 700 miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to August, Georgia, this road largely traveled by foot played a pivotal role in creating some of the state’s metros and major cities. Commemorating the importance of the Great Wagon Road are items in the Rowan Museum such as a wagon made by John Israel Nissen, descendant of original travelers of the road. A personal sign of the road’s importance is on display at the Knox Farm: the rim of one of The Great Wagon’s wheels. John Knox’s eighth generation descendants can’t attest the rim was on their ancestor’s wagon; they only know it’s always been part of the farm’s landscape.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 2, July 2011, p32-34, 36-37 Periodical Website