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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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70 results for "Markovich, Jeremy"
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Record #:
25508
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Vivian Howard’s restaurant, Chef & the Farmer, and TV show, A Chef’s Life, have helped boost Kinston’s local businesses.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 6, November 2015, p134-148, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
34835
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Lovefeast, a Moravian tradition that occurs several times a year, is known for the sharing of sweet buns and coffee. The lovefeast bun is a simple spiced bun with mace and orange flavors. It is a popular dish, and the bakery that sells them in Winston-Salem makes over 24,000 during the lovefeast on Christmas Eve.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p120-124, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25506
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The SANS SOUCI Ferry is one of only three cable-guided ferries left in North Carolina. Located near Windsor, the ferry ride is a five minute trip across the Cashie River.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 6, November 2015, p59-60, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24976
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With the proposal of putting a toll on Interstate 77, many who moved to the suburbs to save money are re-evaluating the costs of living outside the city.
Record #:
37621
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A neighborhood in the metro cited as a New South city has a newer reputation. Originally building a sound economic base from its arts community, Charlotte’s NoDa survived the Recession and closings of multiple art galleries. Today, its positive reputation draws out of towners in and residential real estate represents a bright economic future.
Record #:
36993
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Because of recent immigration trends, approximately forty percent of people receiving American citizenship were not born in North Carolina. Moreover, in nearly one-fifth of the state’s counties, naturalized citizens comprise a majority of the population. As for other ways naturalized citizens have affected the state, the author examines tangible and intangible factors. The tangible includes food and tradition; the intangible includes a sense of hope and determination.
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Record #:
22108
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Carolina Beach has a special piece of history. The town incorporated in 1925; five years later it built a boardwalk. It's not like other boardwalks with shops and food eateries. This one now sits atop a sand dune with the town on one side and the ocean on the other. It burned in 1940 and the town built it back. A hurricane got it in 1944, and in 1954, Hazel destroyed it along with 350 town buildings. It was rebuilt both times. The question always is \"What do we do about the boardwalk?\" But it always comes back and it always remains \"the boardwalk.\"
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Greenville Times / Pitt's Past (NC Microforms), Vol. 28 Issue 2, January 20 2010, p188-192; 194, 196, 198-199, il
Record #:
37942
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How to improve the iconic boardwalk, destroyed twice by hurricanes and once by a fire, has been a problem inspiring many possible solutions since the 1940s. Over the decades, the issue has continued to be on any city election platform and inspired the creation of the Carolina Beach Boardwalk Preservation Association. The author infers the oft-asked question “what do we do about the boardwalk?” needs answering, since the boardwalk built in 1930 is as much a part of a Carolina Beach summer as the beach.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p188-192, 194, 196-199 Periodical Website
Record #:
38149
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Burnsville’s identity is defined by more than a nineteenth century privateer. As much as nearby Mount Mitchell State Park, town square festivals, and local businesses, Burnsville is defined by art. As noted by the author, the art is around downtown, in Toe River Studio and EnergyXchange, and at a glass blower’s Quonset hut. Perhaps not surprising: the 500 artists residing in Yancey County give it one of the greatest concentration of artists in the country.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 2, July 2013, p36-38, 40, 42-46 Periodical Website
Record #:
34902
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In 2008, the Outer Banks Brewing Station in Kill Devil Hills became the only restaurant and pub in the world to have a wind turbine on site. Because of the high power prices, the pub embraced the environmentally-friendly power source and hope to embrace solar energy as well.
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Record #:
29146
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Queens Road West curves through Myers Park, a century-old neighborhood that runs south from Uptown Charlotte. Covering the stately homes and manicured lawns are the giant willow oaks that form a cathedral over street. A century ago, Myers Park was a treeless cotton farm outside the city limits, but when John Nolen was given free reign to create something different, Nolen designed sweeping treescapes to match the gentle topography.
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Record #:
34906
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In Charlotte, North Carolina, a quiet neighbor was planned in the 1920’s. At the time, sprawling green lawns were edged with willow oaks. Now, they loom far overhead and have long branches that make a shaded ceiling over the roads. This article outlines the architect and arborist behind the planned neighborhood.
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Record #:
27284
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Salisbury is a small town in Rowan County. Food Lion was founded there and the town is also home to Catawba College. In the late twentieth century, early Food Lion investors became millionaires due to the success of the supermarket chain. Many of these investors stayed in Salisbury and invested the money in their community, all the while helping to preserve it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p60, 62, 64, 66, 68-69, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25510
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The monthly Blind Pig Supper Club offers a secret menu and location inspired by ingredients grown in Asheville.
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Record #:
25102
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In the mountains of Buncombe County, near Leicester, North Carolina, Dr. Frank King owns a farm. The farm is not home to the typical farm animals, but rather to bison, camels, Watusi, elk, and more. Frank offers tours of the farm and provides visitors with information about the health benefits of the products made from and produced by these animals.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p160-166, 168, 170, 172-173, il, por, map Periodical Website
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