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11 results for Revitalization projects
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Record #:
15842
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The city of Roanoke confronted the problems of a decaying downtown by recognizing that a new approach would be required to reverse the flight to the suburbs. A committee of prominent citizens and business leaders explored the objectives of citizen enthusiasm, recycling of old buildings, preservation and enhancement of the farmer's market, and the developing of vacant land to revitalize the downtown area with success.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Winter 1982, p11-12, f
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Record #:
15884
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For the past decade, the development of a major arts complex has been underway in downtown Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The project is unique in two ways: it represents a pioneering effort to emphasize the arts in the central city revitalization process, and it illustrates the importance of cooperation in effecting redevelopment objectives.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Fall 1984, p18-23, f
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Record #:
23894
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Like many small towns in North Carolina, Shelby, located in Cleveland County, was a thriving mill town until the 1990s. What makes Shelby different, at least according to many current and former residents, is that the town's leaders immediately identified avenues for revitalization. Funding partnerships between private citizens and the local government have preserved old buildings, conserved the town's heritage, and developed museums like the Earl Scruggs Center.
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Record #:
23938
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For over fifty years, Research Triangle Park has been a major contributor to the development of the Raleigh-Durham. Now, the Research Triangle Foundation of North Carolina, the nonprofit organization that operates the park area, is implementing plans to revitalize the park and make it more attractive to new residents.
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24252
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Saxapahaw is an unincorporated town in Alamance County. Originally a mill village, developers have revitalized Saxapahaw by restoring the old mill for reuse as apartments and businesses.
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Record #:
25508
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Vivian Howard’s restaurant, Chef & the Farmer, and TV show, A Chef’s Life, have helped boost Kinston’s local businesses.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 6, November 2015, p134-148, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25526
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Asheboro was always a small Southern mill town and once the textile and furniture plants relocated, downtown businesses struggled to survive. But as the city revitalization project began with Bicentennial Park and the liberation of liquor laws, new businesses are quickly populating once empty storefronts.
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Record #:
27166
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Scattered across Eastern North Carolina are towns that have never really adjusted to several decades of systemic economic changes. Some of these old towns are revitalizing to become notable destinations. In Kinston, Vivian Howard has brought a deserted quadrant of the city back to life with Chef & the Farmer, a sleek restaurant offering soft jazz and modern Southern cuisine.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 21, May 2016, p21-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
30484
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The rural town of Robbins in Moore County, North Carolina was once the home to a modern poultry processing plant, textile mills, and manufacturing industries. Over the years, Robbins began to suffer due to the loss of its manufacturing base and jobs. In 2006, a community chicken dinner led to business plans to revitalize Robbins, which ultimately succeeded in bringing back jobs and growing the local economy.
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Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 93 Issue 4, Winter 2014, p30-31, il
Record #:
31005
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Spruce Pine in Mitchell County, North Carolina is known as “The Home of the Perfect Christmas Tree,” because the town is the setting for Gloria Houston’s children book, “The Year of the Perfect Christmas Tree.” Houston donated her book’s marketing rights to Mitchell County to help create income for displaced textile and furniture workers. The county has focused on developing place-based businesses and artisanal craft shops to revitalize and transform the community.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 12, Dec 2008, p16, il
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Record #:
34926
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The small town of Clinton hosts an authentic Italian restaurant that pulls out-of-towners away from the highway. Alfredo’s Ristorante Italiano is run by Italian-born Alfred DiPinto, who came to North Carolina for school in the 1980’s. After opening the restaurant in 2010, it has pulled in business to the small town, revitalizing the downtown area and encouraged renovation of the historic buildings.
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