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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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48 results for "Manual, John"
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Record #:
6004
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Each year the number of tourists visiting the Outer Banks increases. Crowds flock to Hatteras, Nags Head, and Duck, and Corolla has become \"the mecca of the well-heeled tourist.\" However, beyond Corolla lies what is called the Corolla Outback, a place of Spanish mustangs, wild pigs, and sand dunes that swallow stands of trees, traversed only by a four-wheel drive vehicle. Manuel takes the reader on a tour of this Outer Banks spot few vacationers get to see.
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5941
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The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, located at Topsail Island, treats turtles with problems ranging from cracked shells to severed limbs and bacterial infections. Manuel describes the work of the center.
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Record #:
5252
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Charter schools were established by legislation in the state in 1996 to determine if schools run by private, non-profit organizations with limited state regulations would improve student performance. Manuel discusses four of these schools: Exploris Middle School, Raleigh; SPARC Academy, Raleigh; American Renaissance, Statesville; Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School, Hollister.
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Record #:
5332
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Since the mid-20th-century small game, including quail and rabbits, has been declining in North Carolina. To stem this loss, the North Carolina Division of Wildlife Management has established a program called CURE, or Cooperative Upland Restoration and Enhancement. Manuel discusses the organization of the program.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Spring 2002, p2-6, il
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Record #:
4989
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The Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the nation's most polluted national park as determined by measurements of visibility, ozone levels, and acid precipitation. Manuel discusses causes of the pollution and what steps are being taken to deal with the problem.
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4711
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Clear-cutting in Chatham County is rapidly bringing down forests and woodlots. The technique allows trees to be cut, then ground into wood chips on the spot using one of the eighteen modular chip mills operating around the state. New markets, land for development, and farmers needing extra cash are factors supporting clear-cutting. Opponents argue that mobile chip mills make clear-cutting easier and are seeking to halt new chip mill construction until their effect on soil, wildlife, and water quality can be determined.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 5, Feb 2000, p21-23, 25, 26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4720
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Demand for raw materials for global wood and paper markets, urban sprawl, and need for recreational outlets are changing North Carolina's forests and affecting wildlife populations. Manuel lists three trends in modern forestry and discusses their effect on wildlife: modular chip mills; replacing natural forests with pine plantations; and logging in publicly owned national forests.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p2-7, il
Record #:
4827
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Manuel gives a brief history of lotteries and arguments for and against having them. He then discusses concerns people have about lotteries including are lotteries a reliable source of revenue? do lotteries promote compulsive gambling? who benefits most from lottery revenues? and what state programs are earmarked to receive lottery funds?
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 19 Issue 1/2, Oct 2000, p2-9, 11-49, 56-57, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
4780
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For many, canoeing or kayaking can be another way to view spectacular autumn vistas. Manuel describes four places to paddle and view: New River, Lake Jocassee, Merchant's Millpond, and Bear Island.
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Record #:
4142
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By making some changes in the backyard, homeowners can create wildlife habitats. Adding water will attract many creatures. A birdbath is the simplest way. Reduce lawn size and add more trees, flowers, and shrubs. Put out bird feeders and boxes. Stack logs and rocks to provide nesting places. Control the cat, so that attracted wildlife will not feed the family pet.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1999, p2-6, il
Record #:
4261
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Greenville was once a sleepy, agricultural community, but in 1999, it is a city with a growing population and a variety of employment opportunities. Factors contributing to this change include East Carolina University, Pitt County Memorial Hospital, retail trade, and an increasing number of domestic and foreign business relocations.
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Record #:
3601
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Modular chip mills that can be located anywhere have increased wood chip production. On average, the state's 17 mills clear-cut 127,000 acres yearly. There are questions as to how this will affect soil and water quality and wildlife.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Winter 1998, p2-4, il
Record #:
3918
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Riparian buffers, or wide strips of vegetation along stream and river banks, are effective filters in keeping pollutants from reaching the water. They also control erosion and attract wildlife. One of the most aggressive water pollution plans is a state-mandated one requiring retention of 50-foot-wide buffers on all Neuse River Basin streams.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 4, Fall 1998, p2-6, il
Record #:
3741
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The state-owned Green River Preserve, located in Henderson, Polk, and Rutherford counties, is 20,000 acres of diverse flora and fauna. It is also a managed game preserve providing hunters a place to hunt.
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Record #:
3530
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Wildlife populations rise and fall. For example, game animals, including deer and wild turkeys, existed in low numbers during most of the 20th-century. However, wildlife management has contributed to their remarkable recovery.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Fall 1997, p2-6, il
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