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18 results for Lotteries
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Record #:
280
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North Carolina lawmakers are debating the plausibility of instituting the lottery as a potential answer to the state's tax problems.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Apr 1985, p24-33, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
470
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North Carolina's proposed lottery is reviewed in the context of other states' experiences with a lottery system.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 56 Issue 4, Spring 1991, p25-27, bibl, f
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Record #:
1024
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Past state lotteries in North Carolina have helped finance roads, schools, and churches.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 11, Apr 1993, p12-14, por
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Record #:
1487
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It is not clear if conditioning the statewide effectiveness of a legislative act (such as Senate Bill 11, establishing a lottery) on voter approval in a statewide referendum is an unconstitutional delegation of authority by the General Assembly.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 59 Issue 3, Winter 1994, p10-17, il, f
Record #:
4194
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Each year North Carolina citizens bet $100 million in the Virginia lottery. Georgia also has a lottery, and South Carolina will soon operate one. With all this money bet elsewhere, lottery proponents argue the state should have its own lottery to keep the money home for things like school funding. Opponents argue that lotteries are immoral and exploit the poor. Polls indicate that if the General Assembly gave voters an opportunity to vote on a lottery referendum, it would pass.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 15, Apr 1999, p18-20, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4195
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Opposition to a possible lottery bill in the 1999 General Assembly brings together an unlikely alliance of Groups. The N.C. Budget and Tax Center and N.C. Council of Churches are joining forces with the conservative Family Policy Council and John Locke Foundation to fight the bill.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 15, Apr 1999, p21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4828
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The authors examine thirteen lottery issues and discuss positives and negatives for each. Included are how do lotteries affect compulsive gambling? are lotteries really a reliable revenue source? and who gets the most benefit from lottery revenues?
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Record #:
4827
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Manuel gives a brief history of lotteries and arguments for and against having them. He then discusses concerns people have about lotteries including are lotteries a reliable source of revenue? do lotteries promote compulsive gambling? who benefits most from lottery revenues? and what state programs are earmarked to receive lottery funds?
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 19 Issue 1/2, Oct 2000, p2-9, 11-49, 56-57, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
4998
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With the state facing a possible $1 billion deficit in 2001, Governor Mike Easley is supporting a state lottery as a way to ease this and future financial difficulties. Geary discusses reactions around the state to this proposal, including ones from the North Carolina Council of Churches and the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 9, Feb 2001, p11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5013
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Governor Mike Easley favors a state lottery to bolster declining revenues and wants a referendum on the ballot for voters to decide in 2002. While the Senate appears supportive of the referendum, Easley must convince enough House members to insure citizens get a chance to vote.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 18 Issue 12, Mar 2001, p9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7229
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In the 2005 North Carolina General Assembly, House Bill 1023, 'The State Lottery Act,' passed by a vote of 61-59. The bill has been sent to the Senate for its consideration. Strom summarizes arguments for and against the lottery, which proponents say will generate $400 million annually for school construction.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 15, Apr 2005, p12, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7636
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Mike Easley is in his second term as governor of North Carolina. A Democrat, he has been critical of both Democrats and Republicans on budgetary matters and is the first governor to use the veto. In this interview with BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA senior editor Frank Maley, Easley discusses the newly passed lottery bill and what he has done and wants to do for North Carolina's economic development.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 26 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p8-12, 14-15 Magazine Supplement, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7695
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For years, when attempts were made to pass a lottery in North Carolina, the promise was made that the lottery would only supplement current state education funding. After passage of the lottery bill, that was changed. Secret discusses a budget office forecast that shows the lottery will not supplement the educational funding.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 6, Feb 2006, p13 Periodical Website
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Record #:
7981
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In August 2005, the North Carolina General Assembly passed the State Lottery Act. Proponents had worked for almost two decades to make a lottery in the state a reality. Riggsbee discusses the responsibilities of the North Carolina State Lottery Commission, the allocation of lottery revenue, and other provisions of the statute.
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School Law Bulletin (NoCar K 23 C33), Vol. 36 Issue 4, Fall 2005, p10-15, f
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Record #:
8042
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The General Assembly is debating the merits and demerits of a state lottery, with backers calling it a voluntary tax to fund state programs and detractors call it a sin because it is gambling. Despite “blue laws” that basically forced almost all the stores to be closed on Sundays, the state capital did have gambling in the 1930s and 1940s in the form of “one armed bandits” or slot machines. Some machines dispensed a mint so they couldn't be considered strictly gambling devices. Proprietors of establishments with machines always got their cut of the profits from them. By 1941, however, all slot machines in Raleigh had been removed from public places, because of opposition from churches. They were still used indoors by lodge members, fraternity groups, and even some veteran associations, who referred to using them as “gaming” rather than gambling.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 53 Issue 2, July 1985, p14, 31
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