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13 results for Charter schools
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Record #:
3134
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Legislation passed by the 1996 General Assembly provides for the establishment of charter schools, or schools run by private, non-profit organizations. It is an experiment to see if removing state regulations will improve student performance.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 2, Winter 1997, p23-27, f
Record #:
5191
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Charter schools, publicly funded but privately organized and operated, began operating in North Carolina in 1997. In the fall of 2001, about 17,000 students will enroll in one of the state's 100 schools that are chartered by North Carolina General Assembly legislation. Advocates feel the schools offer choices in education, but legislators are waiting for the state report on charter schools, due in January 2002, before adding more schools.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 9, Sept 2001, p68-69, il
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Record #:
5252
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Charter schools were established by legislation in the state in 1996 to determine if schools run by private, non-profit organizations with limited state regulations would improve student performance. Manuel discusses four of these schools: Exploris Middle School, Raleigh; SPARC Academy, Raleigh; American Renaissance, Statesville; Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School, Hollister.
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Record #:
5250
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The first charter schools opened in North Carolina in 1997. Among the topics covered by the authors are the charter school law, research findings, fiscal impact on the public schools, educational accountability, teacher quality, and children with special needs.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 20 Issue 1/2, July 2002, p2-20, 26-55, 57-65, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
5253
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The charter school movement began in North Carolina in 1996. McLaughlin lists twelve points made by those who support the educational approach and those who oppose it.
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Record #:
8487
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Arcadia Northstar LLC, headquartered in Rutherfordton, is a runner-up in the 2006 Business North Carolina Small Business of the Year competition. The company's managing partners are Tom Williams, Mark Lawing, and Dave Founce. Arcadia was founded in 2001 and employs thirty people. The company projects revenues of $3.3 million in 2006 and provides financial and other services for charter schools.
Record #:
9164
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Legislation passed by the 1996 General Assembly provides for the establishment of charter schools, or schools run by private, non-profit organizations. It is an experiment to see if removing state regulations will improve student performance. Manuel profiles four of these schools: Gaston College Preparatory, Northampton County; Quest Academy, North Raleigh; Children's Community School, Davidson; and Carolina International School, Cabarrus County.
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Record #:
9166
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Duda examines charter school programs in other states, including Florida, California, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington.
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Record #:
13933
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The 1995 General Assembly passed legislation authorizing charter schools, or schools operated by a private, non-profit organization. Of the state's ninety-nine charter schools, almost 20 percent of them are located in Wake and Durham Counties. Republicans want more or them; Democrats worry that they are a form of segregation. Geary discusses the consequences of raising the cap on the number of schools.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 7, Feb 2011, p9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16615
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Senate Bill 8 changed North Carolina's policy for charter schools by eliminating the cap which limited charter schools to just 100 to an unlimited number. Nine applications have been submitted since the bill was enacted last summer. Recently the Public Charter School Advisory Council approved all nine applications submitted, including two for the Durham and Chapel Hill-Carrboro area - both contested by local school boards.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 10, Mar 2012, p9 Periodical Website
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Record #:
23554
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Charter schools have increased in number in North Carolina, but some people fear the schools will capitalize on taxpayer money.
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Record #:
27765
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The Howard and Lillian Lee Scholars charter school is seeking fast-track approval to open in Chapel Hill. The school will focus on minority and low-income students and closing the achievement gap. The Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Board opposes the opening of the charter school as it will lose funding, teacher positions, and special programs as a result. Additionally, board members are concerned about the quality of education the charter school would be able to provide and are planning to fight its creation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 4, January 2012, p12-14 Periodical Website
Record #:
27764
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Charter schools and their effectiveness are explored. The structure of charter schools and what they mean for North Carolina is debated by many as the number of schools increases. Critics dislike the lack of standards and that they take money from public schools, but opponents praise the choices they give parents and students. The makeup of students enrolled is also discussed and graphs presenting North Carolina’s school enrollment by race in Triangle area is included, as well as FAQs about charter schools.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 4, January 2012, p10-11 Periodical Website