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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Game reserves
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Record #:
3093
Author(s):
Abstract:
The gamelands program, administered by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, purchased 18,000 new acres in 1996 for hunting and fishing. New lands include Three Top Mountain in Avery County and 2,200 acres along the Roanoke River.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 4, Fall 1996, p2-5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
8888
Author(s):
Abstract:
On June 7, 1971, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to adopt a new Game Lands program. The new program involves the expansion of the game lands from around 700,000 acres to 1.5 million acres, changes in regulations, reductions in fees and other things that would affect hunters and fishermen. Dean discusses how the new program will work, the new regulations, and what it will mean for hunters, fishermen, and other outdoorsmen.
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Record #:
8916
Author(s):
Abstract:
On June 7, 1971, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to adopt a new Game Lands program. The new program involves the expansion of the game lands from around 700,000 acres to 1.5 million acres. When the question is raised about how fish and wildlife will be protected in the larger territory the answer is that it will be as good or better then it was when the game lands were smaller. Dean discusses how the new lands will be protected.
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Record #:
3741
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state-owned Green River Preserve, located in Henderson, Polk, and Rutherford counties, is 20,000 acres of diverse flora and fauna. It is also a managed game preserve providing hunters a place to hunt.
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Record #:
7881
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund was the brainchild of State Senator Marc Basnight. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers. Not only has the fund protected water resources, it has facilitated significant increases in state game lands and other areas designated for outdoor recreation. One of the largest fund recipients has been the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, which has received almost $77 million for forty-nine projects statewide. The fund is helping the state reach its goal of preserving one million acres of additional open space (the One Million Acre Initiative) by the year 2009.
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