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43 results for Tributaries
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Record #:
17745
Author(s):
Abstract:
Distilling alcohol for private consumption has been regulated in the state since 1715. Complete prohibition occurred in 1908 after the passing of Watts and Ward Law. One reason distillation remained so prevalent in the northeast portion of the state is that distilling used the similar equipment as for making turpentine, an already established industry in the area. Dare County moonshiners took to distilling both because they already had the equipment and also tough economic times drove them to lucrative manufacturing and sale of alcohol.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 9, October 1999, p7-23, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17780
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Vidal's career as a pirate was short-lived and comedic. For one week in 1727, Vidal, who called Bath home, attempted to raid Ocracoke Inlet just after the Gold Age of Piracy. His acts of piracy around the inlet were brought to trial on August 15, 1727 in front of Virginia's Acting Royal Governor. Where Vidal was unfortunate in piracy, he was fortunate in the Governor's ruling which initially was execution but Vidal was later pardoned.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 12, October 2004, p6-17, il
Record #:
1963
Author(s):
Abstract:
Life in the naval stores industry of 19th-century North Carolina is documented in a pictorial series.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p12-15, il
Record #:
2177
Author(s):
Abstract:
After the Civil War, the independent lifestyles of Outer Banks citizens began to change as business interests, such as commercial fishing, moved to the area in competition with traditional cottage industries, such as boat building and net making.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 4, Oct 1994, p14-19, il
Record #:
2629
Author(s):
Abstract:
Development of watercraft that worked the state's coastal waters during then 19th-century is documented in a pictorial series.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p28-32, il
Record #:
1966
Author(s):
Abstract:
Structures related to shallow river navigation, such as wing dams and sluice walls, are depicted in this photographic essay.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p17-19, il
Record #:
3702
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard the pirate was the terror of the coast during the early 18th-century. He was killed near Ocracoke in 1718. A shipwreck found off Beaufort Inlet on November 21, 1996, is thought to be his flagship QUEEN ANNE'S REVENGE.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p30-39, il, f
Record #:
17747
Author(s):
Abstract:
The entire issue is dedicated to the Queen Anne's Revenge shipwreck with historical background about pirates, Blackbeard's escapades throughout North Carolina, and updates from the field excavations.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 11, October 2001, p1-64, il
Record #:
17738
Author(s):
Abstract:
Exploration of the Cape Fear Region began in the 17th-century when prospectors recognized potential for agriculture and timber exploitation. Two men, David Williams and Henry Skibbow, purchased 100 acres of land to become Exeter or New Exeter. The area was to be formally incorporated as a town in 1754. Expectations were for Exeter to become a viable port on the Cape Fear, however, by 1770 it was excluded from customs legislation indicating failure to become a trade center.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1993, p26-31, il
Record #:
17783
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington thrived as a Civil War blockade running port because of its proximity to foreign ports, Bermuda and Nassau, and internal connections via railroad to Charleston and Richmond. Typically blockade runners brought in much needed supplies and were celebrated, however, the steamship Kate also brought along yellow fever in the late summer of 1862. Historic sources vary on total number of deaths but modern scholars believe it to be between 446 to 700 or more.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 13, October 2005, p16-28, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
1972
Author(s):
Abstract:
A process that has been used by foresters and the timber industry is now a valuable tool in assisting historians in precisely dating old houses and maritime artifacts.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p26-29, il, f
Record #:
17805
Author(s):
Abstract:
Public health policy was managed at a local level throughout much of the state's history. Wilmington serves as a case study because of public health policy development for several reasons. The city's need for a health program for its citizens was compounded because of its continually growing population throughout much of history and its role as a bustling port. A history of public health concerns and local officials reactions are reviewed in this article.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 15, October 2008, p27-39, il
Record #:
1941
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pender County middle school students and state archaeologists researched the muddy wreck of what was thought to be the ship SYLVAN GROVE. By studying yellowed newspaper articles and old photographs, the researchers discovered the true name of the vessel.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p1-7, il
Record #:
17732
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackfish is a type of fish considered a delicacy by New Yorkers in the early 20th-century. In Carteret County a group of Scandinavian fishermen moved to the area and brought their specially modified boats. This group of fishermen worked cooperatively and seamlessly with other fishermen and within coastal communities like Beaufort.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Oct 1991, p17-22, il
Record #:
3701
Author(s):
Abstract:
The menhaden fishing industry once stretched from Maine to Florida, but now is centered in four states - Virginia, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The industry peaked in the state in 1956, and the sole plant still operating is in Beaufort.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p6-13, il, bibl
Subject(s):