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7 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008
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Record #:
10520
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Abstract:
The outbreak of World War II caught the United States short of cargo ships to send vital war supplies to the Allies, along with a means to protect them. Scott discusses shipbuilding in Wilmington where 243 ships were constructed. At its peak in 1943, the shipyard employed over 20,000 people.
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Record #:
10519
Abstract:
During World War II thousands of prisoners of war spent time in North Carolina prison camps. Billinger discusses where they came from, what they did as POWs, and how the incarceration changed some of them. The article includes a map identifying the eighteen camps where German POWs were held.
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Record #:
10515
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Ferebee of Mocksville joined the Army Air Corps in 1941. During World War II he would fly sixty-four missions as a bombardier on a B-17. His most famous mission came at the end of World War II, when as bombardier on the Enola Gay, he dropped the atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p12-14, il, por
Record #:
10518
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weeksville, near Elizabeth City in Pasquotank County, was a major U.S. Naval Air Station during World War II and a major player in the battle against German submarines. Here were based lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic, hunting German U-Boats.
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Record #:
10514
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Harrington records a sampling of North Carolinians who were noted for heroism and self-sacrifice in World War II. Eight military men from the state received the nation's highest award for bravery, the Medal of Honor; four received it posthumously.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
10517
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early days of World War II, German submarines sank Allied ships within sight of the North Carolina coast. Duffus recounts incidents from the dark days of 1942, when German U-Boats ruled the seas off North Carolina.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p22-24, il, por
Record #:
10516
Abstract:
Over 350,000 American women served in World War II, including 7,000 from North Carolina. Trojanowski describes their activities and lists several women and their activities as representatives of all who served.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p15-17, il, por