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9 results for Harrington, Sion H., III
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Record #:
21276
Abstract:
The partisan warfare that took place in North Carolina during the Revolutionary War is both fascinating and disturbing. However, it is beyond the range and scope of this article which concentrates on the people and events of the Upper Cape River Valley between 1781-1782. Harrington attempts \"to explain this significant historical event in terms of what it was, when and where it occurred, who participated and why, the nature of the conflict and, most importantly, its impact both on society in the near term as well as the subsequent history of the area.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Oct 1997, p9-14, map, bibl
Record #:
21286
Abstract:
At the Battle of Averasborough, fought in Harnett and Cumberland counties on March 16, 1865, a Union force of about 26,000 was opposed by 5,400 Confederates under the command of General William J. Hardee. Although the Confederates were defeated after a battle of a day and a half, they held Sherman's approaching mammoth army long enough to allow General Joseph J. Johnston to gather his forces for the Battle of Bentonville two days later.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 4 Issue 1, June 1998, p11-12, map
Record #:
21296
Abstract:
Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Leo Hartland Hardy of Aurora, NC, served aboard one of the US Navy ships operating off the north Russian coast 1918-1919. He was aboard the destroyer USS J. Fred Talbot. They were there in support of American, British, and other countries' troops that were sent there in support of the White Russians who were fighting against the Bolsheviks. The US had sent 4,500 men and over 500 had been killed between September 1918 and July 1919. Hardy wrote a series of letters, with interesting and sometimes shocking observations, about what happened there. These letters are now preserved in the Military Collection of the North Carolina State Archives.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Nov 1998, p12-13, por
Record #:
21314
Abstract:
During the 20th century over one million North Carolinians have served in the nation's military. All who wear the uniform are heroes. Harrington relates the stories of four who demonstrated the spirit of selfless service and devotion to duty--Robert Lester Blackwell (WW I), James D. Lancaster (WW II), Jerry K. Crump (Korea), and Hiram Strickland (Vietnam).
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Win 2000, p6-7
Record #:
21341
Abstract:
Most of the state's military historians recognize the name of Major George Preddy of Greensboro, who was one of the top fighter pilot aces in the European Theater during World War II. Greensboro has another airman, not so well-known, but noteworthy nevertheless. Edwin Vance Bain Jr., was one of Doolittle's Raiders that bombed Japan in 1942. He flew in India, Burma, and other areas. He was killed in 1943 on a return from a bombing mission to Rome. Among his awards were the Distinguished Flying Cross, Soldier's Medal, and the Military Order of China.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Spr 2002, p12-14, por
Record #:
21453
Abstract:
Leonard Day, of Morehead City in Carteret County, joined the US Navy on April 9, 1917, three days after Congress declared war on Germany. Harrington recounts his experiences and the ships he served on. On March 4, 1918, Fireman First Class Day and five other North Carolinians were numbered among 306 passengers and crewmen aboard the USS Cyclops which left Barbados bound for Baltimore. Between March 4 and March 13, the ship and everyone on board vanished in the infamous Bermuda Triangle. No trace has ever been found. Day was declared officially to have \"died\" on June 14, 1918.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p9, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
10514
Abstract:
Harrington records a sampling of North Carolinians who were noted for heroism and self-sacrifice in World War II. Eight military men from the state received the nation's highest award for bravery, the Medal of Honor; four received it posthumously.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
29145
Abstract:
Ltc. Sion H. Harrington, III repeats of a story told to him by Chaplin Larry Smedley of the 82nd Airborne Division of a paratrooper exercise at the Jungle Operations Training Center training in Panama. Smedley was on a jump exercise as an enlisted man years before when an accident happened. A mechanical failure occurred during the jump and many of Smedley’s fellow soldiers jumped into the path of an oncoming aircraft and were killed when they hit the plane’s propellers. Smedley relates how his life was spared during the exercise and how the accident caused him to become a chaplain in the Army.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Fall 2005, p18-19
Record #:
21362
Abstract:
This is a history of the Cumberland Plough Boys written by the unit's commander Captain James S. Evans, probably in the early part of the 20th century. Harrington has written the introduction.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Fall 2003, p3-6