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15 results for North Carolina--History--World War, 1939-1945--Aerial operations
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Record #:
2021
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greensboro native George E. Preddy, Jr. was the leading combat flying ace in Europe during World War II until he was accidentally shot down by his troops on Christmas Day, 1944.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 7, Dec 1994, p32-34, por
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Record #:
2146
Abstract:
During World War II, Colonel Robert K. Morgan of Asheville was the pilot of the Memphis Belle, the first American bomber to safely complete twenty-five missions over Europe between November, 1942 and May, 1943.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 9, Feb 1995, p33-34, il
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Record #:
15154
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barrage balloons were a developmental aerial defense strategy for the coast during World War II. The contraption consisted of cigar-shaped neoprene bags inflated with helium and moored to winches controlling altitude. The object of barrage balloons was to create aerial obstacles for enemy airplanes. Balloons placed strategically had the desired effect of pushing enemy aircraft either off target or forced bombers to drop their arsenal at higher altitudes, meaning better chance of inaccuracies. Barrage balloon training began in April 1940 at Camp Davis, near Wilmington, as part of the Coast Artillery Corps.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 28, Dec 1941, p8-9, il
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Record #:
20417
Author(s):
Abstract:
Staff Sgt. George Z. Howard of Charlotte was shot down on his 17th bombing mission over Germany in August 1943. He was taken prisoner and held for 21 months in several prison camps. During that time he secretly kept a diary of the events that transpired during his captivity. Excerpts are presented here.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 9, Jul 1945, p9, 14
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Record #:
21345
Abstract:
At age 17, Holt Thornton was a senior in Durham High School. Two years later, having dropped out of school, he was 19 and a veteran of the US Army Air Force, having flown 52 bombing missions over Europe. Alexander recounts Thornton's training and some of mission, including three on the Ploesti oil fields in Romania. He was discharged from Fort Bragg in September 1945 and started his senior year at Durham High School. His air group received a Presidential Unit Citation and he personally received the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart, and the Air Medal. Today, at age 78, he and his wife live in Zebulon.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002, p19-22, il, por
Record #:
21351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Warlick was a radio operator on a PBY during a daring rescue of a downed B-17 crew in the stormy Pacific on December 30, 1941. He recounts the actions of the pilots and crew during the rescue. Both the pilot, Frank M. Fisler, and co-pilot, co-pilot, Leonard H. Wagoner, were awarded the Navy Cross, and crew members received other medals. Fisler was killed in action in 1943. Wagoner, a native of Mitchell County, retired in 1961. Warlick earned his Navy Wings of Gold and retired after 27 years with the rank of Commander.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Spr 2003, p1-7, il, por
Record #:
21454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ferebee was born on a Davie County farm near Mocksville. After college he joined the Army Air Force before World War II began and trained as a bombardier. He flew over 60 missions over Europe and earned a reputation as one of the best bombardiers in the Air Force. He also made two friends who would be important to him later in the war--Paul Tibbets, a talented pilot, and Theodore van Kirk, a skilled navigator. In 1944 he was ordered back to the US by special request of Colonel Tibbets. On August 6, 1945, with Tibbets flying the Enola Gay, bombardier Thomas Ferebee dropped the first atomic bomb ever used in wartime on the Japanese city of Hiroshima.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p10, por
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Record #:
21452
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this continuing series profiling North Carolina veterans of World War II, Samuelson recounts the experiences of Conrad \"Gus\" Shinn of Spray. He was a multi-engine pilot in the South Pacific and flew onto islands where fighting was taking place bringing in blood and medical supplies and taking out the wounded--sometimes under fire. He continued flying with the Navy after the war and took part in special secret operations in Antarctica. In 1956, he was the first pilot to land and take off from the South Pole. Mount Shinn, Antarctica's third highest mountain, is named for him.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spr 2007, p7-8, il, por
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Record #:
21468
Abstract:
During World War II, Camp Sutton in Union County was a US Army engineer training base and prisoner-of-war camp. Camp Sutton housed over 1,000 German soldiers captured in France, Italy, and North Africa. One Camp Sutton prisoner, Matthias Buschheuer, relates his experiences which were common amongst his German comrades. Buschheuer's pleasant experiences at Camp Sutton created strong bonds with many North Carolinians that became lifelong friendships.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 61 Issue 4, Oct 1984, p481-509 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
21524
Abstract:
Barrie S. Davis of Zebulon was flying his P-51 Mustang fighter as bomber escort on a mission to Romania on June 6, 1944 when he was attacked by a German Me-109. Davis's canopy was shot away and his right wing shredded. Wounded, he was able to make it back to his base in Russia. For years he wondered who his opponent had been. In 2009, the opportunity came, and he flew to Bucharest to meet the other pilot, Ion Dobran, now a retired Romanian air force general.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Spr 2010, p1-3, il, por
Record #:
21562
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cooke recounts the wartime experiences of Henry Murphy of Burgaw, a carrier pilot aboard the USS Enterprise in the South Pacific during World War II. Murphy was flying an Avenger torpedo plane along with his two-man crew during a major two-day attack on Formosa on October 12, 1944, when his plane was shot down killing all three men.
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Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 17 Issue 1, Spr 2011, p9-12, il, por, map, bibl
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Record #:
21741
Abstract:
This article examines the U.S. Civil Air Patrol (CAP) North Carolina Wing from 1941 to 1944 during World War II, which was part of the North Carolina Office of Civilian Defense (NCCD). The article also discusses defenses against German U-boats, funding sources, coastal illuminations and veteran status for CAP volunteers.
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Record #:
21756
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the military career of Lieutenant General Frank A. Armstrong Jr. between 1942 and 1943. During that time, Armstrong was stationed in Great Britain and commanded the 97th Bombardment Group and the 306th Heavy Bomb Group on the U.S. Eighth Air Force.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 88 Issue 2, Apr 2011, p164-188 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
23086
Abstract:
Daniel R. Taylor Jr., one of Judge Ward's early law clerks, describes the life of Judge Hiram Ward beginning with Ward's service in the military during World War II through his legal career as a lawyer and judge.
Source:
North Carolina State Bar Journal (NoCar KF 200 N67), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Summer 2014, p20-25, 37, il, f
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Record #:
10515
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Ferebee of Mocksville joined the Army Air Corps in 1941. During World War II he would fly sixty-four missions as a bombardier on a B-17. His most famous mission came at the end of World War II, when as bombardier on the Enola Gay, he dropped the atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p12-14, il, por