NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Submarine warfare--North Carolina
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5205
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weeksville, in Pasquotank County, was a major U.S. Naval Air Station during World War II and a major player in the battle against German submarines. Here were based lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic, hunting German U-Boats. The base housed 850 officers and men and had two large hangers, one steel, the other wooden. The wooden hanger was the largest wooden structure in the world; it burned in August 1995.
Source:
Record #:
9256
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year, divers charter boats on the North Carolina coast to take them to the underwater shipwrecks in the GRAVEYARD OF THE ATLANTIC. Four German U-boats from World War II are in these waters, and one of them, the U-352, was discovered in 1975. Located 115 feet down, the remains of ten Nazi sailors as well as an unfired torpedo rest in the hull of the submarine.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 2, July 1978, p8-9, il
Full Text:
Record #:
15867
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two giant hangars were built in Weeksville, Pasquotank County, in 1941, to house blimps used in anti-submarine warfare during World War II. One was the largest wooden structure ever built. Swift describes how the blimps operated during the war and what happed to the base after the conflict was over.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 9, Feb 2012, p48-52, 54, 56, 58, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
10518
Author(s):
Abstract:
Weeksville, near Elizabeth City in Pasquotank County, was a major U.S. Naval Air Station during World War II and a major player in the battle against German submarines. Here were based lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic, hunting German U-Boats.
Source: