NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Sea Chest Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7565
Abstract:
Preston Stowe discusses his life as a boatbuilder. Stowe's first experience in boatbuilding was in 1938, when he helped his father build a boat. In 1941, he worked at the Norfolk Ship Building and Drydock Company, and in 1942, at a boatyard in Manteo. After the war, he began building his own boats. The largest boat he has built is twenty-six feet and the smallest sixteen feet. Juniper is his main wood source.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p24-28, il
Record #:
7564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The SEA CHEST staff continues the compilation of entries contained in the weather station's log books which are housed at the Cape Hatteras Weather Service. This issue contains selected observations for the years 1875 and 1876.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p16-19, il
Record #:
7563
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gordon Watts is the state underwater archaeologist and one of the discoverers of the MONITOR. In this SEA CHEST interview, he discusses the history of the MONITOR and how it was found.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p2-13, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
7566
Abstract:
Cape Hatteras National Seashore naturalist Clay Gifford discusses the effect of litter on wildlife. Many people who litter along the beaches or in natural areas often do not realize the harm they are creating for wildlife. Among the items Gifford considers a menace to wildlife are monofilament fishing line, plastic six-pack bottle holders, paper from Polaroid films, and cans. Birds can be ensnared, strangled, or poisoned by these items.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p36-37, il
Record #:
7568
Author(s):
Abstract:
Maurice Bernard Folb, Chief Pharmacist's Mate with the U.S. Navy, first came to Hatteras Island in 1920. In this SEA CHEST interview, he talks about his arrival in Buxton, midwives and their remedies, dipping vats and cattle drives, baseball, and other pastimes.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p48-57, il
Record #:
7567
Abstract:
Austin discusses the fundamentals of net tying. He fished with his brothers from 1925 until he went off to World War II. When more net was needed when fishing, he got the equipment and materials and tied on more net. Austin illustrates fifteen steps in how to tie a fishing net.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p38-43, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
35970
Author(s):
Abstract:
One tale involved whiskey runners during the Prohibition, which inspired the transcribed tune about the town's role in the flourishing of the alcohol trade. Another story that could be considered legend involved the crew of the Crissie Wright, a ship first found drifting around Diamond Shoals. Added to the mystery were the frozen crew of the ship whose drifting ended in Beaufort harbor. The discovery inspired a saying still known in Carteret County, “cold as the night the Crissie Wright came ashore.”
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p22-23
Record #:
35972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Detailed primarily were eventful and uneventful cases of labor and delivery this doctor attended during his six years of services. His descriptions included timely obstetric practices, such as use of pituitrin, and life threatening childbirth-related conditions like sepsis. As for his patients, offered also were observations that showed his respect for the people and their culture.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p58-65
Record #:
35971
Author(s):
Abstract:
“A picture is worth a thousand words” comes to life nine-fold in these photos taken in Buxton. The time frame covered ranged from the reign of the model A to the prevalence of cars offering four-wheel drive. Scenic views were of forests, the lighthouse, and local homes. Activities mentioned for then and now noted the enduring value of family reunions and baseball.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Spring 1976, p30-33