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9 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005
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7211
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Although the doors are closed, Flora Macdonald College, located in Red Springs, Robeson County, lives on through the memories of its alumnae. The liberal arts college for women was supported by the Presbyterian Church and was open from 1896 to 1961. The college was named for the Scottish heroine who lived in North Carolina's Cape Fear region for five years during the Revolutionary War. The campus now is home to the Flora Macdonald Academy, which serves pre-kindergarten through grade twelve students.
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7213
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The Maola Milk & Ice Cream Company started in 1935, in New Bern. The company's name is a combination of the owner's last name, Mayo, and Coca-Cola. F.E. Mayo owned the New Bern Coke distributorship and the milk company. Dodd traces the company's growth from four employees in 1935 to more than 400 in 2005. Ice cream is now produced at the High Point plant, while the New Bern plant produces about 80,000 gallons of milk per day, as well as juice products.
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7212
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Many vacationers travel with the family pet, but they sometimes have difficulty finding accommodations that are pet-friendly. Waller describes three bed and breakfast inns in the North Carolina mountains that are hospitable to humans and their pets. They are the Buffalo Tavern Bed and Breakfast (West Jefferson); B&B at Ponder Creek (Mars Hill); and the Madison Inn, Restaurant and Mountain Lodge (Black Mountain).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p34-36, 38-40, il Periodical Website
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7219
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In 1895 and 1896, retired Boston merchant James W. Tufts bought Moore County land to develop the Sandhills Village of Pinehurst. He did not intend it for golf, but rather as a warm climate resort for retirees and for those in ill health. He added a golf course when his Northern guests began arriving with their golf clubs and looking for a course to play. Master golf architect Donald Ross designed the course, and Pinehurst began its rise to one of the top golfing destinations in the world. Pittard discusses Pinehurst's early history and memorable golfing moments.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p136-138, 140-142, il, por Periodical Website
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7216
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The stretch of U.S. Highway 129 starting at Cheoah Dam near Robbinsville in Graham County and ending at Tabcat Bridge in Tennessee is called the Tail of the Dragon. In this particular eleven-mile stretch, over 300 curves, steep grades, and tight turns test the driving abilities of motorists, motorcyclists, and bicyclists. The speed limit is 30 mph, although it used to be 55 mph on the North Carolina side of the road. Johnson describes the road and its attraction to cyclists.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p104-106, 108-109, il Periodical Website
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7217
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In the 19th-century, many people vacationed at elaborate resorts located near mineral-rich springs, where days were passed in dining and socializing. Vacationers were eager to partake of the waters which were said to be therapeutic. By the 1920s, medical advances brought an end to the resorts and their healing waters. Westbrook describes four of the most popular springs: Jackson Springs (Moore County); Fuquay Springs (Wake County); Mount Vernon Springs (Chatham County); and Hot Springs (Madison County).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p112-114, 116-117, il Periodical Website
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7218
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State-operated farmers' markets are a uniquely Southern phenomenon. They provide customers fresh produce and give small farmers an outlet for their crops. The five state-owned regional markets in North Carolina are the Piedmont Triad Farmers Market (Colfax); Western North Carolina Farmers Market (Asheville); Charlotte Regional Farmers Market (Charlotte); Southeastern North Carolina Agricultural Center Farmers Market (Lumberton); and the State Farmers Market at Raleigh (Raleigh).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p118-120, 122-124, il Periodical Website
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7214
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Using the alphabet, the writers describe twenty-six interesting places to visit during the summer months. These include the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, Bost Grist Mill, Charlotte Trolley Museum, Doughton Park, and the Zebulon Latimer House Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p78-84, 86-88, 90-92, il Periodical Website
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7215
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The North Carolina State Park System started on March 3, 1915, when the North Carolina General Assembly established Mount Mitchell as the first state park. Today there are twenty-nine state parks covering over 250,000 acres of land and water and featuring a variety of geography, plant life and wildlife.
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