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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Stewart, Al
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Record #:
1527
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The author discusses the movement toward privatization in NC in the context of similar movements nationwide.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Apr 1994, p12-18, il
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Record #:
2081
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Dr. Arthur S. Link, a graduate of the University of North Carolina, is the leading authority on Woodrow Wilson's presidency. In 1994, Link finished editing COLLECTED PAPERS OF WOODROW WILSON, a 69-volume work in 39,000 pages.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 8, Jan 1995, p14-15, il
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Record #:
2220
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Eden, the most populous city in Rockingham County, is a mid-sized town near the Virginia border that boasts a healthy and diversified economy as well as a number of historic homes and sites.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 11, Apr 1995, p10, il
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Record #:
2624
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Best known as the birthplace of country music star Randy Travis, Marshville, in Union County, also boasts a 2,000-employee turkey plant and an auction barn.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 7, Dec 1995, p10, il
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Record #:
2701
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James Iredell, Sr., jurist, statesman, and Revolutionary War patriot, is one of only two North Carolinians ever appointed to the United States Supreme Court.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Feb 1996, p33, por
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Record #:
3800
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In November, 1998, the North Carolina Pottery Center opens in Seagrove. The culmination of sixteen years of planning and raising funds, the Center seeks to make the public aware of the state's rich pottery history and traditions. Educational programs, exhibits, and collection and preservation are among activities to promote this.
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Record #:
5808
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Square dancing is one of the most popular dance styles. Over 110 clubs have been organized statewide since the first began in the Triad in 1951. Bills were introduced in the 1995 and 1997 General Assembly to make square dancing the official state folk dance, but they failed.
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Record #:
5956
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The Jackson Library at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro houses the Women Veterans Historical Collection. It is the only collection of its kind nationally and \"celebrates the considerable contribution women veterans have made in all branches of military service.\"
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Record #:
6987
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From January 1 through December 31, 2005, the North Carolina Transportation Museum in Spencer is featuring an exhibit of the contributions women have made to transportation in North Carolina. Included in this exhibit are such women as Harriet Berry and Mary Nicholson. Berry had a crucial role in passage of the state Highway Act of 1921. Nicholson was the first licensed female pilot in North Carolina. She flew with the British Air Transport Auxiliary during World War II and was killed in action in 1943.
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Record #:
7211
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Although the doors are closed, Flora Macdonald College, located in Red Springs, Robeson County, lives on through the memories of its alumnae. The liberal arts college for women was supported by the Presbyterian Church and was open from 1896 to 1961. The college was named for the Scottish heroine who lived in North Carolina's Cape Fear region for five years during the Revolutionary War. The campus now is home to the Flora Macdonald Academy, which serves pre-kindergarten through grade twelve students.
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Record #:
7599
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James K. Polk, eleventh president of the United States, was born in Mecklenburg County on November 2, 1795. Polk's life and career was divided between North Carolina and Tennessee. He was graduated from the University of North Carolina but lived thereafter in Tennessee. He served in Congress for fourteen years and became Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1835. Later he ran for president in 1844, campaigning on a pledge to serve just one term. As president, Polk championed the cause of westward expansion of the United States, settled the Oregon boundary dispute with England, and gained Congressional recognition of a state of war with Mexico and the annexation of Texas.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p25-27, il, por Periodical Website
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