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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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880 results for Coastwatch
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Record #:
1867
Abstract:
The authors address the issue of the private use of public waters, using the public trust doctrine to provide a context. The public trust doctrine determines the extent of a state's control over its public waters.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1994, p16-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2645
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Abstract:
Migrating and wintering birds can find a good food supply from such berry-producing trees and shrubs as red cedar, red bay, wax myrtle, and Carolina laurelberry.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1995, p20-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19390
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Abstract:
When it comes to shellfish, people want in on the act, and clam and oyster culture in North Carolina claim more adherents than any other aquaculture combined.
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Record #:
32204
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Abstract:
An excerpt from North Carolina author Bland Simpson’s “Two Captains from Carolina” highlights a pivotal moment for Moses Grandy, an accomplished African American mariner born in the antebellum South. Simpson describes how he brought to life the stories of two disparate captains and what their narratives mean to him.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p12-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
19309
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Abstract:
North Carolina Sea Grant scientists have already proved that striped bass hybrids can be farm-raised. But how do they stack up in the marketplace? The hybrid has passed the test and is becoming an influential aquaculture crop for the state.
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Record #:
19042
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Abstract:
North Carolina State University's Marine Aquaculture Research Center (MARC) is a hybrid of science and economics, proving that mariculture and aquaculture is feasible and can be inexpensive.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2013, p18-23, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
841
Abstract:
Some present-day NC Indian tribes, especially the Waccamaws, take great pains to preserve their past.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1992, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4842
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Abstract:
Piping plovers winter and summer on North Carolina's coast in areas including Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout. However, wildlife officials report a drop in the plover population over the past several years. The migratory bird's decline is attributed to predators and loss of habitat.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2000, p23-24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4729
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Abstract:
Next to Washington state, North Carolina has the nation's second-largest ferry system, with twenty-four ferries operating year-round. Besides transporting two million passengers yearly, the ferry system is a lifeline for many communities. In emergencies, ferries assist in hurricane evacuation and also aid in water rescues. Soon selected ferries will become science labs, carrying automated devices to monitor such data as salinity, temperature, oxygen levels, and nutrients in coastal waters.
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Record #:
1401
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Abstract:
Fort Macon, built between 1826 and 1834 in Carteret County, is a popular tourist spot and a witness to decades of North Carolina history, including the April 25, 1862, Civil War battle.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p13-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
19306
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Abstract:
From the fishermen to the processors and distributors, the North Carolina seafood industry is going the extra mile to make sure consumers receive quality seafood.
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Record #:
1405
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Abstract:
The project to deepen Morehead City's harbor presented the town of Atlantic Beach with five million cubic yards of free sand, yet the sand itself was not sufficient to settle the debate over beach nourishment.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1994, p16-18, il Periodical Website
Record #:
19088
Abstract:
More Americans are taking to the seas to dive and have found that North Carolina waters are a particularly good place to do so. From history to fishes, SCUBA diving in the state provides a variety of opportunities.
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Record #:
1996
Abstract:
Marine debris has a worldwide impact on wildlife, economics, the environment, aesthetics, and public health. In May of 1994, individuals from around the globe met in Miami to discuss this growing problem and to recommend possible solutions.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1994, p2-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19298
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along North Carolina's coastline, it is a never-ending battle for survival. For plants, the coast is not an easy place to grow, but with the right tools and knowledge, coastal landscapers can turn the harsh environment into a vegetated spot.
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