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62 results for "CHES Studies"
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Record #:
24893
Abstract:
The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System has found that there is a geography factor to consider when looking for health indicators. Health care access is varied across various counties and regions. Poorer areas had worse health care outcomes while the wealthiest areas had better health outcomes.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 137, Aug 2003, p1-7, bibl, f
Record #:
24894
Abstract:
Certain sociodemographic factors, maternal behaviors, and intensity of smoking during pregnancy can determine a baby’s outcome. They may also determine the likelihood a woman will stop smoking during pregnancy. The poorer and less educated a woman is, the less likely she is to quit.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 138, Oct 2003, p1-8, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Veterans Health Administration collaborated with the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to compare the health conditions and behaviors of discharged male veterans with male non-veterans in North Carolina as well as compared to the United States. As a whole, some of the behaviors and risks explored are smoking, disability, arthritis, and being overweight.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 133, June 2002, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
24888
Abstract:
As healthcare is necessary for maintaining a healthy lifestyle, the question of whether health risks mean limited healthcare must be answered. Three groups are studied: those with chronic illnesses, high risk behaviors, or who fail to comply with recommended preventative health care practices.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 131, February 2002, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
24887
Abstract:
Years of potential life lost refers to the number of years left to live at death below life expectancy. According to the data presented, certain habits and preventative measures can be targeted in health promotion programs.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 130, Feb 2002, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
24886
Abstract:
The life expectancy is affected by factors such as how many years will be spent in good mental health, good health and good mobility. This survey shows significant factors affecting health and life expectancy in North Carolina.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 129, Jan 2002, p1-16, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24891
Abstract:
Maternal smoking can cause harm to an infant in many ways. There is an increased risk for SIDS, and babies are more likely to have a low birth rate which can lead to health complications later in life. If women were to stop smoking during pregnancy, the infant mortality rate would drop significantly.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 135, Aug 2002, p1-6, bibl, f
Record #:
24890
Abstract:
African American women are more likely to get cervical cancer, be diagnosed at a later stage of cancer, and die from cervical cancer. Edwards and Buescher look into the statistics to determine just what the difference between African American and White women getting cervical cancer is.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 134, Aug 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
24892
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System monitors the rate of unintended pregnancies in North Carolina. With a PRAMS assessment, 200 new mothers are sent a survey to fill out to determine maternal behaviors before, during, and after pregnancy.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 136, Nov 2002, p1-5, bibl, f
Record #:
5311
Abstract:
This study examined \"the prevalence and treatment of persistent pediatric asthma across four systems of North Carolina Medicaid health care delivery: Carolina Access, Access II/III, Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), and fee-for-service.\" Jones-Vessey discusses the study and its conclusions.
Source:
CHIS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 124, February 2001, p1-9, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
5312
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study \"demonstrates serious under-ascertainment of maternal mortality through death certificate reporting alone, and presents selected statistics by cause of death and demographic groups based on an enhanced surveillance method.\" The authors discuss the study and its results.
Source:
CHIS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 125, April 2001, p1-7, il
Record #:
24885
Abstract:
Catherine Sanford, Katrina Baggett and Michael Bowling explore the rate of reporting external causes of injury are reported to accompany injury-related diagnosis codes. These codes are used to study external causes of injuries.
Source:
SCHS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 128, Dec 2001, p1-9, bibl, f
Record #:
5310
Author(s):
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was \"to examine the impact of the three major breast cancer treatment types, age, and stage of diagnosis on the survival rates of breast cancer patients.\" Simsek discusses the study and its results.
Source:
CHIS Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 123, December 2000, p1-9, il, bibl
Subject(s):
Record #:
29456
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1998 there were over one-thousand deaths from breast cancer among North Carolina women. Data from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry were analyzed to determine the impact of three major breast cancer treatment types, age, and stage at diagnosis on the survival rates of breast cancer patients.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 123, Dec 2000, p1-9, il, bibl, f
Record #:
24884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Those living in poverty may have an increased risk for preterm births. This is especially relevant for those of African American descent.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. 99 Issue , February 1996, p1-12, il, bibl, f