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13 results for Health promotion
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Record #:
1931
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report examines how well North Carolina is meeting 30 national health objectives that are grouped under the following headings: preventative health services, health protection, and health promotion.
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CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 65, June 1992, p1-67, il, bibl
Record #:
2131
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1991, the state set objectives to improve citizens' health by the year 2000. To date only one objective, reducing teenage pregnancy for ages 15-17, has been met, while others have not yet been achieved.
Source:
CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 87, Nov 1994, p1-32, il, bibl
Record #:
2303
Abstract:
A survey by the State Center for Health and Environmental Statistics of private sector worksites that offer health promotion activities shows that businesses with 100 or more workers are the most likely to provide such activities.
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CHES Studies (NoCar RA 407.4 N8 P48), Vol. Issue 92, Mar 1995, p1-27, il, bibl
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Record #:
2392
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the cost of health care on the rise, many large and small companies in the state are focusing on wellness and prevention programs. This approach not only helps keep health costs down, but also increases worker productivity.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 7, July 1995, p22-24,26,28,30-31, il
Record #:
11934
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Abstract:
Lail examines cities and towns that are promoting wellness in their communities, including Bessemer City, Carolina Beach, and Apex.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 58 Issue 5, May 2008, p10-11, il
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Record #:
23624
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three mountain entrepreneurs have promoted natural remedy solutions for overall health. These include Jeannie Dunn, owner of Red Moon Herbs in Asheville; Ric Scalzo, President and CEO of Brevard-based Gaia Herbs; and Corey Pine Shane who teaches at Blue Ridge School of Herbal Medicine.
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Record #:
25031
Author(s):
Abstract:
While fish is a healthier alternative to fatty meats like beef, there are certain fish to avoid if on a low-cholesterol diet. In addition frying fish is the least healthy way to prepare it and other methods could produce a better, healthier serving of fish.
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Record #:
25029
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Abstract:
Salt is an ingredient that contains many health risks and isn’t always necessary. Joyce Taylor gives her advice on how to reduce or even eliminate the use of salt in seafood cooking.
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Record #:
25030
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Fat and cholesterol can cause high blood pressure and cholesterol in your body. There are certain foods to avoid and others to substitute for these unhealthy foods.
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Record #:
26239
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Researchers in the UNC Health Services Research Center are conducting projects on health promotion among the elderly. They hope to determine whether coverage of selected preventive health services might reduce the cost of disease treatment, and if routine medical screening can reduce risk behavior and improve the quality of life for elderly participants in the program.
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Record #:
29663
Abstract:
Businesses in North Carolina are aware of the connection between health and productivity. Along with the help of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, companies are utilizing wellness programs and health screenings through hired nursing staff, to provide support for their employees.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p36, 38, por
Record #:
30337
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colon Terrell, a retired banker in Raleigh, is walking three-thousand miles across the United States to raise awareness of heart disease prevention. The American Heart Association in Raleigh is an active partner in Terrell’s walk and is assisting with promoting the walk by hosting several events across the nation.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 91 Issue 1, Spring 2012, p14-17, por
Record #:
36232
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Abstract:
Responding to the trend of health consciousness was Winston-Salem’s Primo Water Company. Part of its profile was company-related challenges, such as a decrease of retailers to promote its products. Encouraging a continuation of services were statistics, such as number of individual water bottles saved when Primo jugs were used an average of 40 times. Also inciting service continuation was a reminder about the 2016 Flint, Michigan water crisis and harmful chemicals that may be still present in everyday tap water.