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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Plastic containers
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Record #:
11575
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On October 1, 2009, North Carolina becomes the first state in the Southeast to ban plastic bottles from landfills. Massachusetts and Wisconsin have similar bans. Legislators designed the bill to reduce energy consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions, as well as reduce litter and save landfill space. Every year, North Carolinians throw away over $41 million in plastic.
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Record #:
26798
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An ideal conservation bill for North Carolina to introduce would be a bottle bill that requires plastic beverage containers to be returned and reused. By transitioning back to the returnable system, the state could reduce litter and save energy, resources, and tax dollars.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p11, il
Record #:
30860
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On October 1, 2009, North Carolina will become the first state in the Southeast to ban plastic bottles from landfills. Legislation was introduced to reduce energy consumption and lower greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to save landfill space and reduce litter. The new law will also have positive effects on the state’s economy.
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Record #:
30868
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On September 1, 2009, North Carolina enacted a new state law banning plastic bags from many retailers on the Outer Banks in a pilot program that may expand to the entire state. The law requires retailers to stop giving out plastic bags, and instead offer customers recycled paper bags and incentives for them to bring in their own reusable bags. As the Outer Banks implement the new system, they are finding that paper bags are more expensive and may be less environmentally desirable than plastic bags.
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Record #:
36232
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Responding to the trend of health consciousness was Winston-Salem’s Primo Water Company. Part of its profile was company-related challenges, such as a decrease of retailers to promote its products. Encouraging a continuation of services were statistics, such as number of individual water bottles saved when Primo jugs were used an average of 40 times. Also inciting service continuation was a reminder about the 2016 Flint, Michigan water crisis and harmful chemicals that may be still present in everyday tap water.