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11 results for Winston-Salem--Economic conditions
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Record #:
592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Creativity and the imaginative entrepreneurial spirit are seemingly inexhaustible in Winston-Salem.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 48 Issue 9, Sept 1990, p26-29, il
Record #:
999
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem produced an attractive incentive package to convince Glenn Orr, CEO of Southern National Bank, to move his company's headquarters back to town.
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Record #:
1021
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pepsi-Cola Co. is moving its customer service and other operations into the former RJR Nabisco headquarters in Winston-Salem. Wake Forest University is the present owner of the facility.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Apr 1993, p34, por
Record #:
1137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem has experienced a recent economic resurgence.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 7, July 1993, p23-38, il
Record #:
5145
Author(s):
Abstract:
Historic Winston-Salem and Forsyth County, located in the heart of the Piedmont Triad, are discussed in this NORTH CAROLINA magazine community profile, which highlights the area's strong emphasis on education, support of established and developing businesses, and shift from a manufacturing area to a more service-oriented one.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 8, Aug 2001, p25-26,28,29,32,34,36,40,42,44,46,48,52,54, il
Record #:
17908
Abstract:
Winston-Salem was a small but growing city of 143,000 in 1966. Many worked in the city's tobacco and textile industry but remained below the poverty line due to the low wage and seasonal nature of the jobs. To curb crime and promote economic development of its citizens, Winston-Salem organized the Office of Economic Opportunity with its main branch protect \"Experiment in Self-Reliance;\" both served as models for the state.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 33 Issue 3, Nov 1966, p9-14
Record #:
24371
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem’s North Carolina Baptist Hospital experienced serious money deficits as a result of spiraling inflation and a building expansion that was over budget. Various factors have contributed to the hospital's success in weathering the crisis.
Record #:
24379
Author(s):
Abstract:
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. CEO F. Ross Johnson moved the company headquarters and mounted a management buyout. This ultimately shocked Winston-Salem citizens, since the company brought much-needed business to the city.
Record #:
24411
Abstract:
The face of manufacture in Winston-Salem is changing, especially since most of the business in the city is based on the tobacco industry. This article discusses how businessmen helped the city’s growth potential by making improvements to the Super Block.
Record #:
36592
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the creation of the CMA (Colored Merchants Association) in Winston-Salem, NC, which tried to help the small black independent grocery stores to compete with Chain Stores by using group buying power to match the lower prices the Chain Stores. It worked for a while until the Depression closed many stores.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 46 Issue No. 2, , p25-26, il
Record #:
36232
Author(s):
Abstract:
Responding to the trend of health consciousness was Winston-Salem’s Primo Water Company. Part of its profile was company-related challenges, such as a decrease of retailers to promote its products. Encouraging a continuation of services were statistics, such as number of individual water bottles saved when Primo jugs were used an average of 40 times. Also inciting service continuation was a reminder about the 2016 Flint, Michigan water crisis and harmful chemicals that may be still present in everyday tap water.