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31 results for Pottery
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Record #:
21907
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This article examines the production of tin-glazed ceramics in Salem, North Carolina and other parts of the country. Tin-glazed ceramics were first introduced to the Moravian community in Salem by Carl Eisenberg near the end of the 18th century.
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Record #:
21908
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This article examines the various ceramic traditions in 19th century Salem, North Carolina as produced by Moravian potters such as Heinrich Schaffner.
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Record #:
21929
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This article examines the archaeological excavations that took place at the Mount Shepard pottery site in north-central Randolph County. Excavations provided a vast amount of 18th century pottery for inclusion into North Carolina pottery typologies that include Piedmont ware and Moravian varieties.
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Record #:
21943
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This article examines the flow of pottery material, styles and craftsmen from the Connecticut River Valley into the Cape Fear region of North Carolina. It also focuses on the Webster family of Connecticut, a family of potters who were responsible for the unique work identified as the 'bird and fish pottery.'
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Record #:
24462
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D.K. Clay Ltd. in Clayton is at least one of the largest and most successful pottery studios in North Carolina. The business has two large production kilns, 10,000 square feet of historic building, three full-time potters, and multiple other staff people.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 7, December 1990, p17-19, il
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Record #:
27570
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An inkstand made by John Bell in 1825 is the first inscribed American tin-glazed pottery to be discovered. The tin-glaze technique was introduced by German potter Carl Eisenberg who visited Salem, North Carolina in 1793. Since tin-glaze was so uncommon at the time, many questions remain unanswered regarding Bell’s apprenticeship, influences, and products.
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Record #:
27581
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One of the earliest marked examples of southern salt-glazed stoneware is a jug produced by B. Duval & Company in Richmond, Virginia. Owned by apothecary Benjamin Duval, the company manufactured pottery to complement Duval’s medicine business. The jug is now on display at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27834
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Archaeological excavation and research reveal new information on Virginia’s early potting industry. The wares of Virginia potters started to appear along eastern coastal shipping routes, suggesting a change in the marketing of pottery. Excavated earthenware show a more common German form and have been documented among the wares made by the Moravians in North Carolina in the eighteenth century.
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Record #:
27838
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The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina researched the history of the Southern Porcelain Company. The company was created in 1856 and utilized white clay from the Edgefield pottery district of South Carolina to produce a variety of wares. Most of its products were never marked, but some earthenware was marked “S.C.P.Co., Kaolin, S.C.”
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Record #:
27835
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Archaeological excavation and research of the Tildon Easton pottery site in Alexandria, Virginia has enhanced the knowledge base in earthenware and stoneware through much of the nineteenth century. Research also provides evidence of competition for the Wilkes Street pottery, and a better understanding of the industry’s economics and operation in the eastern region.
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Record #:
27836
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In the early nineteenth century, Petersburg, Virginia was a dominant source of good stoneware clay and widespread distribution of finished goods throughout the eastern region. Petersburg was also manufactured a unique style of pottery. Lowndes pottery produced distinct stoneware adorned with high-quality cobalt decoration and script signatures.
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Record #:
27837
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A number of potters in the Tidewater region exported wares to North Carolina in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The Virginia pottery were strongly influenced by the Germanic pottery tradition.
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Record #:
5775
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North Carolina has a rich pottery tradition stretching from the present-day back to Native Americans 2,000 or 3,000 years ago. From its early utilitarian days, pottery has evolved into an art form. At one time there were over 200 potteries in the Seagrove area, and some potters working there today are ninth-generation. House discusses pottery and places in the state to view it.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 3, Mar 2003, p22-24, il
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Record #:
35119
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Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Record #:
36174
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Pamolu Oldham measured the value of art by the amount of light and way that space was used. Being mindful of these aspects generated an awareness of other aspects, valuable on both sides of the canvas: people and animals, interior and exterior settings, and objects secular and sacred.
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