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8 results for Design and ornaments
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Record #:
9625
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Charlotte artist David Fesperman uses an unusual medium--aluminum cans--to create unique, geometric ornaments. He works without machinery, even though he uses a metal pattern for cutting, so that he can guarantee that each creation is different.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 7, Dec 2007, p166-1668, 170, 172, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27585
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In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the area that is now Shenandoah County, Virginia served as a principal migration route from Philadelphia to North Carolina. Trade centers and developers in the region brought together a variety of cultures. This diversity created one of the most interesting American regional styles in decoration and craftsmanship.
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Record #:
27582
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John Shearer of Martinsburg, West Virginia is credited for the largest group of documented Chippendale furniture. Shearer’s furniture pieces are marked by unique stylistic qualities in design and ornamentation, Shearer’s signature, and numerous inscriptions. An 1801 desk-and-bookcase regarded as Shearer’s masterpiece is in collection at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27583
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Neoclassical and Empire are two major styles of brass andiron produced in Charleston, South Carolina. These two styles were brought to light through an analysis of Charleston brass founders conducted at the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
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Record #:
27649
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The signs that hang on buildings and advertise restaurants and businesses in Durham are explored. Martha Scotford is professor emeritus in graphic design at NC State University and explains how sign type conveys emotions and how it tells a story. With development in Durham, the personality of the city as told through its signs is explored. Photographs of signs discussed are also presented.
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Record #:
27725
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A study by the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts in Winston-Salem, North Carolina found evidence and surviving artifacts of early clock making traditions in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Among these are works produced by Thomas Walker and John Weidemeyer, which reflect neoclassical decoration and sophisticated movements unique to the region.
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Record #:
27836
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In the early nineteenth century, Petersburg, Virginia was a dominant source of good stoneware clay and widespread distribution of finished goods throughout the eastern region. Petersburg was also manufactured a unique style of pottery. Lowndes pottery produced distinct stoneware adorned with high-quality cobalt decoration and script signatures.
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Record #:
27848
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Robert Wellford was the leading composition ornament maker during the Federal period, and the single supplier to North Carolina and southern states. His work constitutes one of the largest assemblages of neoclassical ornament and allegory in America. Motifs created by Wellford vary from purely ornamental arabesques and foliage to elaborate scenes drawn from history and mythology.
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