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7 results for Moravians--Salem
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Record #:
3115
Author(s):
Abstract:
To visit at Christmastime the Moravian village of Old Salem in Winston-Salem is to step back a century and experience Christmas without modern-day traditions or conveniences.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 7, Dec 1996, p24-26, 35, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3310
Author(s):
Abstract:
The re-created gardens at the Moravian village of Old Salem in Winston-Salem remind visitors how much settlers depended on their fruits and vegetables, plants for medicines, and food for livestock.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 56 Issue 12, May 1989, p18-21, il
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Record #:
10713
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although the Salem Christmas 1800 program is only in its third year, it is already considered a great success, having attracted more than 3,000 people from the Winston-Salem area last year. The program, sponsored by Old Salem, Inc., features live actors portraying the sights and sounds of a traditional Moravian Christmas as it would have been celebrated 169 years ago. Records show that the Moravians had few distinctive Christmas customs and that holiday celebrations were largely a continuation of the closely-knit community life as it was lived day by day.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 13, Dec 1969, p10-11, 31, il
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Record #:
21371
Abstract:
A look at the culture and history of the Girls' Boarding School, founded in the Moravian settlement of Salem, North Carolina, focusing on the impact that the decline in keeping to a communal lifestyle and the changes brought on by the increase in area population had on the school and its buildings' architecture.
Source:
Record #:
6200
Author(s):
Abstract:
How did the early settlers get their water? Main sources were wells, rainwater cisterns, river, and springs, but water from a faucet was unheard of. In the Moravian settlement at Salem, however, a waterworks was installed in 1778. Ratcliff describes how this system, which began with the use of bored oak and heart-of-pine logs, was created.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p2-4, il, bibl
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Record #:
31540
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Single Brothers Workshop in Old Salem, the restored 18th Century Moravian village, is a reconstructed workshop which adapts yesterday’s crafts to the present. Visitors to the workshop take part in the craftsmaking that resulted in the original town’s prosperity. Two-hundred years ago, unmarried men of the village Salem earned their living in the workshop where Colonial commerce flourished.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 12 Issue 11, Nov 1980, p11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35777
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author offered descriptions of restored homes such as Halifax’s 1760 Owens House and Kenanville’s 1800 Liberty Hall. Included was description of events such as the Outer Banks village of Rodanthe’s celebration of little Christmas. From the collection of these holiday happenings, revealed was how the Yuletide season was celebrated in the Tarheel State during its pre and post-Colonial days.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p25-26