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10 results for Historic buildings--Raleigh
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Record #:
1184
Author(s):
Abstract:
The restored Borden House opened in February as a meeting center and home of the new Raleigh City Museum.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 43 Issue 8, Aug 1993, p6-7, por
Record #:
6967
Author(s):
Abstract:
METRO design editor Diane Lea discusses the role of The National Society of Colonial Dames of America in the State of North Carolina in saving, restoring, and maintaining three of the most significant residences associated with the role of the state and the capital city in the Revolutionary War. The residences are the Joel Lane House (Raleigh) ca. 1770; Haywood Hall at New Bern Place (Raleigh) 1799; and the Burgwin-Wright House (Wilmington) 1770.
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Record #:
8621
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1847, plantation owner John Haughton had his slaves build St. Mark's chapel on his property in Chatham County. Haughton moved from Tyrrell County to Chatham County in 1837 and bought all of the land that is the present-day town of Gulf. A funeral in 1934 was the last service conducted in the church while it was in the town of Gulf. St Mark's was moved to Siler City and reconsecrated in 1957. A small white church, St Mark's was moved to Raleigh's Mordecai Historic Park in 1980 where it remains today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p14-15, 29, il
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Record #:
8756
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several interesting people lived at the Sir Walter Hotel in the 1950s and 60s. Among them were North Carolina Chief Justice Susie Sharp, and State Treasurer Edwin Gill. Arthur Buddenhagen took over hotel management in 1946. Today, the hotel is used as apartments for the elderly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 5, Oct 1980, p20-23, il, por
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Record #:
10509
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh's historic Oakwood District is a collection of Greek Revival, Victorian, Queen Anne, Second Empire, and Neo-Classical-styled homes built between the Civil War and 1914. Lea describes the 1893 Queen Anne cottage owned by Eve Ragland Williamson (Mrs. Robert B. Williamson).
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Record #:
18793
Abstract:
Two houses have been moved to downtown Raleigh. As part of an initiative to revitalize downtown Raleigh, two historic buildings (the 1890s Bretsch House and the 1906 Montgomery House) were also prevented demolition by their move.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 31, Apr 1982, p2, f
Record #:
20800
Author(s):
Abstract:
Opened in 1953, Dorton Arena in Raleigh is one of North Carolina's most ambitious and historically significant pieces of architecture. When construction was completed in 1952, it won First Honor Award of the American Institute of Architects and the Gold Medal in Engineering of the Architectural League of New York. In 1972, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places and in 2002 it was dedicated as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The designer was Matthew Nowicki, who was killed in a 1950 plane crash before construction began. It was the first permanent building in the world to support its roof by suspended steel cables.
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Record #:
15696
Abstract:
The marker was erected on Burke Square in Raleigh to commemorate the Executive Mansion. Before the Executive Mansion, state governors lived in various locales and sometimes hotels around Raleigh before Governor Thomas Jarvis insisted on an official residence. The Executive Mansion was the product of this plea and Governor Daniel G. Fowle was the first to reside in the mansion.
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Record #:
28048
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina was once a leader in mental health, but after years of reforms the state no longer is. Because of this, the historic Dorothea Dix Hospital in Raleigh has stopped accepting patients. Established in 1848, the hospital served up to as many as 3,000 patients at a time with two or three times as many workers. Mental health funding in the state has received major cuts over the years and it is cheaper to send patients to other facilities.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 49, December 2010, p5, 8 Periodical Website
Record #:
35777
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author offered descriptions of restored homes such as Halifax’s 1760 Owens House and Kenanville’s 1800 Liberty Hall. Included was description of events such as the Outer Banks village of Rodanthe’s celebration of little Christmas. From the collection of these holiday happenings, revealed was how the Yuletide season was celebrated in the Tarheel State during its pre and post-Colonial days.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 7, Nov/Dec 1979, p25-26