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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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43 results for "Electric utilities"
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Record #:
10312
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North Carolina's population is growing rapidly. By 2030, it will reach twelve million, making the state the seventh largest in the nation. Demand for energy is also keeping pace with this growth. Hughes discusses what steps Progress Energy Carolinas (formerly Carolina Power & Light) is taking to meet this increasing need for electricity.
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35230
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Innovative, according to Lindsey Linstrom, , is defined by the new services provided to customers in the Piedmont region, courtesy of Randy Brecheisen’s efforts. As for this CEO of thirty-three years, he might have also defined it by a considered second career—a new way to define “retirement.”
Record #:
3748
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Over one hundred electric utilities, including those of city governments and consumer-owned cooperatives, provide the state's electricity services. Each utility operates in an assigned area.
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Record #:
7710
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There are over one hundred separately organized electric utilities that serve customers in North Carolina. Depending on the location of an individual's home or place of employment, electric service could be provided from a consumer-owned cooperative, an investor-owner utility, a city government, or some other utility operating in the state. Each type of service covers a designated area.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 38 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p14-15, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
28669
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More than 100 electric power providers serve nearly 10 million people in North Carolina. These include consumer-owned electric cooperatives, investor-owned utilities, city governments, university-owned utility, or other utilities. The history, service areas, regulations of the electric power providers in the state are described and a map provides the service areas in the state.
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Record #:
8050
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There are over 1,430 highway historical markers in North Carolina. The state's newest marker is located south of Tarboro on Hwy 33. It was unveiled in July 2006, on the 70th anniversary of the founding of the state's first electric cooperative, Edgecombe-Martin County Electric Membership Cooperation, and recognizes the place where an electric cooperative first brought power to rural North Carolina.
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Record #:
30985
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North Carolina’s electric utilities are including natural gas generation as a bigger part of resource plans, along with renewable energy and efficiency measures, in an effort to make up for delayed coal-fired and nuclear generation. This article discusses natural gas consumption in North Carolina, and bridging the gap between now and when advanced low-emissions power generation technologies become available in the future.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 8, Aug 2008, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
2163
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In an era of increased competition and relatively slow growth, Duke Power's CEO William H. Grigg is guiding the company into new areas such as power development in Latin America and the Pacific Rim, world-wide engineering services, and Duke Net.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 2, Feb 1995, p8-11, il
Record #:
10879
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William Bulgin McGuire, president of Duke Power Company, is featured in this month's We The People Magazine's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
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Record #:
31718
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Thirteen candidates filed for Governor in the May 6 primary elections. In this article, each candidate provided their statements on issues of concern to North Carolina electric cooperatives and the rural economy.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 4, Apr 1972, p4-13, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
8391
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North Carolina's population is growing. Electric cooperatives that have primarily served rural areas are adapting to service more families and commercial facilities in places that were recently croplands and woodlands. Top executives in three of North Carolina's fastest-growing cooperatives discuss changes that are occurring in their service areas: Union County; Ashe and Watauga Counties; and the Albemarle Sound area.
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Record #:
30897
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The North Carolina Transmission Planning Collaborative identified seventeen major transmission projects as part of the 2007-2017 Collaborative Transmission Plan for North Carolina. The projects represent more than four-hundred million dollars in investments for improved electric utilities and transmission.
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Record #:
7804
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Two of the state's Touchstone Energy cooperatives received recognition for the care they take in the management of trees and other vegetation affecting power lines and poles. Union Power Cooperative is the first North Carolina utility to be named a Tree Line USA Utility. This award is sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation and the National Association of State Foresters. The Dow AgroSciences industry magazine, Right-of-Way Vistas, recognized Pee Dee Electric for its right-of-way vegetation management program. The cooperatives serve a region between Charlotte and Lumberton.
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Record #:
30898
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New energy policy legislation requires electric cooperatives, by 2018, to have ten percent of their total electricity needs generated from renewable resources or displaced through effective energy efficiency programs. More renewable energy for North Carolina will need an upgraded transmission network to go where it will be needed.
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Record #:
31368
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Hurricane Diana brought damaging winds and rains to several southeastern North Carolina counties in mid-September. Thousands of homes and businesses served by Electric Membership Corporations lost power for as long as five days. This article describes the impacts of the storm, and the efforts to repair and restore power.
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