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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Electric power
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Record #:
14309
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Abstract:
This article focuses on a large-scale, multi-million dollar power plant that was built in Leaksville. The project was worthy of attention because of the scale and cost. It was a $15,000,000 investment.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 31, Jan 1949, p9, il
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Record #:
26322
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The NC Utilities Commission endorsed wildlife habitat migration in the construction of electric power reservoirs.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p18
Record #:
30618
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winter Storm Jonas brought snow and freezing rain to most of North Carolina in January 2016. At the storm’s peak, North Carolina Electric Cooperatives reported twenty-five thousand power outages, with most of the outages occurring in the Sandhills and central regions of the state.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Mar 2016, p8, il, por
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Record #:
30651
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Abstract:
Winter storms in mid-February and early March left many North Carolinians without electric power or stranded on roads. On February 12, Winter Storm Pax brought twenty inches of snow in the eastern counties. During Winter Storm Ulysses on March 6, ice accumulation on power lines caused widespread power outages and a state of emergency was declared.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p8, il, por
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Record #:
30897
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Transmission Planning Collaborative identified seventeen major transmission projects as part of the 2007-2017 Collaborative Transmission Plan for North Carolina. The projects represent more than four-hundred million dollars in investments for improved electric utilities and transmission.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p9
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Record #:
30981
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Since the 1970s, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have been engaged in promoting renewable energy resources such as wind, solar, hydropower, and biomass. Consumers in the state currently benefit from over two percent of their power from hydro resources, as well as small self-contained solar and wind projects. Challenges to renewable energy include transmission, intermittency and the need for advancements in storage technology, as well as high construction costs and delays.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p8, il
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Record #:
30980
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Abstract:
North Carolina’s electric cooperatives distribute electricity produced from a variety of sources including carbon-neutral nuclear generation, natural gas, diesel generation, coal, hydro and renewable resources. This diversity of energy resources helps ensure that electricity remains reliable and as affordable as possible. New state legislation mandates that three percent of electric cooperatives’ energy be met through renewable energy products.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 5, May 2008, p7, il
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Record #:
31044
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Abstract:
NC GreenPower was launched in 2003 to encourage the development of renewable energy resources in North Carolina through voluntary, tax-deductible contributions that individuals can make through their electric bills or directly to the program. The minimum contribution level is four-dollars per block of renewable energy generated and added to North Carolina’s power grid.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 8, Aug 2007, p10, il
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Record #:
31100
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The worst ice storm in recent history paralyzed much of central and western North Carolina Wednesday night, December 4, 2002. As many as 1.5 million homes, businesses, schools, and farms in the state were without electric power as a result of the ice storm.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Jan 2003, p8, il, por
Record #:
31106
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Abstract:
Five weeks after what was called the most destructive ice storm in North Carolina history, citizens were still rebuilding damaged property, removing debris and telling survival stories. The freezing rain and ice accumulation of December 4-5, 2002, paralyzed central North Carolina communities, as well as areas in the Blue Ridge Mountains foothills. More than 1.8 million people were without electric power for as long as ten days.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 2, Feb 2003, p10-11, il, por
Record #:
31163
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Abstract:
On August 14, 2003, a series of equipment outages in the Midwest led to uncontrolled cascading outages of power transmission lines and generators serving North Carolina and other northern areas for up to fifty hours. Questions and answers about the power outage are provided in this article, as well as a discussion on operating procedures for massive outages.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 10, Oct 2003, p11, il, por
Record #:
31228
Abstract:
The North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, along with Duke Power, North Carolina’s municipal electric utilities, and others, are members of the Southeastern Electric Reliability Council, a regional group established to ensure a reliable and adequate bulk power supply. This article describes how electricity is transmitted throughout the region, and discusses deregulation and other potential changes which may impact North Carolina’s utility industry.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 33 Issue 7, July 2001, p11-14, il, map
Record #:
31309
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Abstract:
Unit One of the Catawba Nuclear Plant has produced its first electricity as part of preliminary testing of the facility, which is partially owned by North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations. The plant, which is located in York County, South Carolina, nineteen miles southwest of Charlotte, is a joint venture involving electric co-ops, municipalities and Duke Power Company.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 17 Issue 2, Feb 1985, p16, il
Record #:
31504
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Electric Membership Corporations are preparing to purchase a share of the Duke Power Company’s Catawba Nuclear Station in the wake of a decision by the Rural Electrification Administration to guarantee financing for the project. After three decades of negotiation, this represents the first step toward establishing a comprehensive power supply program for the state’s rural electric program.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p6-7, il
Record #:
31569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alton P. Wall served thirty-eight years as executive vice president and general manager of the three corporations comprising the statewide North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation organization. This article is a tribute to Wall’s leadership in the electric industry, and discusses the progression of power, spanning from a Delco kerosene generator to nuclear power plants.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 8, Aug 1978, p8-9, por