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9 results for Wildlife reintroduction--North Carolina, Western
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Record #:
5412
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a 200-year absence, elk were reintroduced into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in 2001. The herd has increased by six calves, three of which survived. A second herd of thirty was released in the spring of 2002, as part of a five-year study to see if the elk will be able to survive over the long term.
Record #:
26322
Author(s):
Abstract:
The NC Utilities Commission endorsed wildlife habitat migration in the construction of electric power reservoirs.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p18
Record #:
9702
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wooten discusses a project of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to introduce steelhead trout into western North Carolina lakes and tributaries.
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Record #:
9719
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Abstract:
Golden eagles are being reintroduced into the North Carolina mountains in the Shining Rock area.
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Record #:
9775
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Abstract:
The muskellunge are native to the French Broad and Little Tennessee river systems, but by the 1950s they were almost gone. This decline was caused by chemical pollution and siltation from timber operations, agriculture, and land development. Improvements in water quality by 1970 allowed for the reintroduction of 1,500 “muskies” into the French Broad River and 500 into the Little Tennessee. Wooten discusses the program and its results.
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Record #:
9857
Author(s):
Abstract:
Less than twenty years ago, the muskellunge had all but disappeared from its rivers in western North Carolina. Improved pollution controls have been vital to the restoration of this game fish.
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Record #:
3523
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the mid-1800s, elk were eliminated from the state. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park and other agencies are conducting studies to see if elk can be reintroduced in the park. If the report is favorable, fifty elk will be released in 1998.
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Record #:
4987
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over-hunting and habitat destruction eliminated the Eastern elk from the Smoky Mountains by the mid-1800s. Now the National Park Service seeks to introduce the Manitoban elk, a close relative of the extinct Eastern elk, to the Smoky Mountains National Park. In February 2001, twenty-five elk were released. Another twenty-five will be released in 2002 and 2003. If the species can sustain itself over a five-year period, it will be allowed to remain.
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Record #:
5185
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Park Service has reintroduced elk to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In June 2001, a 40- pound elk was born, the first-elk born in the Smokies in 150 years. Whether or not the elk will be able to reproduce is one question the five-year Smokies elk experiment should answer.
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