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7 results for Elk
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Record #:
5412
Author(s):
Abstract:
After a 200-year absence, elk were reintroduced into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in 2001. The herd has increased by six calves, three of which survived. A second herd of thirty was released in the spring of 2002, as part of a five-year study to see if the elk will be able to survive over the long term.
Record #:
24025
Author(s):
Abstract:
York recounts his experience with a particularly daring elk in the Great Smokey Mountains. The wildlife photographer found himself on the receiving end of an aggressive animal.
Record #:
3523
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the mid-1800s, elk were eliminated from the state. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park and other agencies are conducting studies to see if elk can be reintroduced in the park. If the report is favorable, fifty elk will be released in 1998.
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Record #:
4987
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over-hunting and habitat destruction eliminated the Eastern elk from the Smoky Mountains by the mid-1800s. Now the National Park Service seeks to introduce the Manitoban elk, a close relative of the extinct Eastern elk, to the Smoky Mountains National Park. In February 2001, twenty-five elk were released. Another twenty-five will be released in 2002 and 2003. If the species can sustain itself over a five-year period, it will be allowed to remain.
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Record #:
5185
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Park Service has reintroduced elk to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In June 2001, a 40- pound elk was born, the first-elk born in the Smokies in 150 years. Whether or not the elk will be able to reproduce is one question the five-year Smokies elk experiment should answer.
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Record #:
26861
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent study, sponsored by the National Rifle Association, discovered that elk can distinguish safety orange from other colors and may have better color perception than biologists previously thought. Despite this discovery, the chances of success are not diminished for skilled outdoorsmen. The orange vests do diminish a hunter’s chances of being mistaken for an elk.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Nov 1981, p2, por
Record #:
36560
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offering better healthcare outcomes is often a byproduct of diet, accounting for the food source itself and its source. Meats touted as nutritious and delicious include bison and elk. Benefits of these meats noted by King are lower cholesterol content and higher levels of protein and iron. As for environmental factors that impact produce and meat quality, the author recommended preserving topsoil and balancing the soil ecosystem. Such actions can yield healthy carbon levels and grasses for animals that positively impact their nutrient output.