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6 results for Wildlife conservation programs
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Record #:
16769
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are a number of federally funded programs to assist landowners with conservation projects, such as increased wildlife populations, improved water quality, and wetlands protection. Knight briefly describes three of them--the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP); Environmental Quality Incentives (EQIP); and Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program (WHIP).
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Record #:
16767
Author(s):
Abstract:
Landowners who want to promote wildlife conservation sometimes feel those who provide help are speaking in code. For example, a landowner who goes to the FSA office has a choice of CRP, WRP, EQIP, FIP, SIP, or WHIP programs. Sharpe provides a quick review of the agencies and programs.
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Record #:
24099
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four red wolf puppies were born at the Nature Center and are expected to thrive and bolster red wolf populations in the nation. The Species Survival Plan saved the red wolf from extinction after only 14 pure wolves remained in the entire world.
Record #:
26895
Author(s):
Abstract:
Government budgets for wildlife conservation and pollution control programs are being cut. Consequently, agencies such as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are unable to fulfill their responsibilities of managing and protecting the nation’s wildlife.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 5, May 1982, p2, il, por
Record #:
26765
Author(s):
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County wildlife programs in North Carolina involve the cooperation of local citizens, landowners, and government agencies. Each county program is tailored to manage and conserve the local wildlife resources with respect to local interests and needs.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1983, p4
Record #:
30849
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Duke Lemur Center in the Duke Forest, the only lemur center in the world, offers the rare opportunity to observe and learn about endangered lemurs. The center is devoted to conserving the lemur, which is a primate indigenous to Madagascar, and has partnered with the Madagascar Fauna Group. Together they work with the Malagasy people in reforestation, sustainable agriculture, and conservation of the dwindling habitat.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 4, Apr 2009, p33, il
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