NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


17 results for Wooten, Curtis
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
9421
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1973, big game hunters in North Carolina have been required to tag and report the harvest of some big game species, such as black bear, female deer, and wild turkeys. In 1976, it will be mandatory for hunters to tag and reports kills of all big game animals. Wooten discusses the reasons for this.
Record #:
9424
Author(s):
Abstract:
The mandatory big game tagging and reporting system will begin with the 1976 fall hunting season. Wooten describes how the program will work.
Record #:
9726
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning in the 1940s, widespread use of DDT and other pesticides had a disastrous effect on wildfowl reproduction. In North Carolina eagles were wiped out and ospreys all but exterminated. Lake Ellis and Orton Pond were two osprey sites which escaped serious infestation of pesticides. While osprey populations are again on the rise, severe weather, predators, and habitat destruction can limit the survival of a number of fledglings.
Record #:
9464
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's only nesting colony of brown pelicans was discovered in 1929 on Royal Shoal, a low island located about ten miles northwest of Ocracoke Island in Pamlico Sound. Wooten discusses follow-up sightings and studies and why the brown pelican is on the endangered species list.
Full Text:
Record #:
9496
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of migrating birds either pause and move on or winter in North Carolina. Godfrey describes four of them--the pileated woodpecker, red-winged blackbird, red-tailed hawk, and the eastern bluebird.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9520
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fifteen species of wildlife are endangered in North Carolina. They are the bald eagle, Indiana bat, gray bat, brown pelican, ivory-billed woodpecker, Kirtland's warbler, mountain lion, spotfin chub, shortnose sturgeon, Atlantic leatherback turtle, American alligator, red-cockaded woodpecker, peregrine falcon, Bachman's warbler, and the Florida manatee. Wooten discusses how these species became endangered.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9544
Author(s):
Abstract:
The largest ranges for the state's black bear population are the mountains and the Coastal Plain. The bears face an uncertain future, and while research and restoration are helping, it is the ongoing loss of habitat that is the real problem for them.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9669
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pigeon River rises near Shining Rock and flows clear and pristine through mountains and valleys until it reaches Canton, where the Champion Paper Mill is located. From there downstream the character of the water changes; the water becomes brown and too warm to support much fish life. Wooten discusses balancing environmental concerns with the strong economic boost the mill gives the region.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
9685
Author(s):
Abstract:
Godfrey describes Nags Head Woods, which is a near wilderness of forest, ponds, and rare plants that cling to a precarious existence on the Outer Banks. The Woods lie on the Roanoke Sound just below the Wright Brothers National Memorial.
Full Text:
Record #:
9702
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wooten discusses a project of the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to introduce steelhead trout into western North Carolina lakes and tributaries.
Full Text:
Record #:
9708
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission operates five fish hatcheries. Wooten discusses a visit to a hatchery and what to look for.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9719
Author(s):
Abstract:
Golden eagles are being reintroduced into the North Carolina mountains in the Shining Rock area.
Full Text:
Record #:
9729
Author(s):
Abstract:
Johannes Plott came to America from Germany in 1750, eventually settling in New Bern, before moving on to Cabarrus County. He brought with him two Hanoverian-type Schweisshunds (bloodhounds) and soon became a dog breeder. The Plott hound is an intelligent animal, has a formidable reputation as a hunter, and tends to be a one-person dog. In 1946, the dog was recognized by the United Kennel Club, and years later by the American Kennel Club. On August 12, 1989, the North Carolina General Assembly officially recognized the Plott hound as the State Dog. The Plott hound is one of only four breeds started in this country.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
9775
Author(s):
Abstract:
The muskellunge are native to the French Broad and Little Tennessee river systems, but by the 1950s they were almost gone. This decline was caused by chemical pollution and siltation from timber operations, agriculture, and land development. Improvements in water quality by 1970 allowed for the reintroduction of 1,500 “muskies” into the French Broad River and 500 into the Little Tennessee. Wooten discusses the program and its results.
Full Text:
Record #:
9828
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rails are often called marsh hens because of their salt marsh habitats and chicken-like build. Hunting rails goes back to the 1800s; they are a hard quarry to seek and find and attract only the hardiest of hunters. Wooten describes rail hunting on the Outer Banks and includes several recipes for preparing them for the table.
Full Text: