NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


15 results for Secret, Mosi
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
7666
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rev. William J. Barber, II, who grew up in Plymouth in Washington County, is the minister of Greenleaf Christian Church in Goldsboro. He is the new head of the North Carolina NAACP. Barber seeks to bring young people into the organization, organize it from the ground up, and make the venerable civil rights organization the powerhouse it once was. Barber holds a Master of Divinity from Duke University School of Divinity and a Doctor of Ministry from Drew University in Madison, New Jersey.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 5, Feb 2006, p21, 22-24, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7695
Author(s):
Abstract:
For years, when attempts were made to pass a lottery in North Carolina, the promise was made that the lottery would only supplement current state education funding. After passage of the lottery bill, that was changed. Secret discusses a budget office forecast that shows the lottery will not supplement the educational funding.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 6, Feb 2006, p13 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8044
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricanes striking North Carolina have not devastated large population centers as Hurricane Katrina did in New Orleans. Still, the state has had its share of disasters from Fran, Floyd, Bonnie, Dennis, and Isabel. Katrina exposed serious deficiencies in hurricane response at the Federal level. This in turn places more responsibility on county and state emergency managers. Secret discusses what needs to be done and what state and local officials are doing to stay ahead of the coming storms.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 25, June 2006, p16-17, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8570
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising in Orange County, the Eno River flows through an urban and suburban landscape before merging with the Flat and Little rivers to form the Neuse. This small river has been fought over by developers who wanted to exploit it and environmentalists who wanted to preserve it. In the late 1960s, Holger and Margaret Nygard helped organize the Association for the Preservation of the Eno River to defeat Durham's attempt to dam the river. The association has helped to set aside almost 4,000 acres for the Eno River State Park. This is over half of the 7,000 acres planned for the park. The association is finding it harder to acquire and protect the remaining acreage. Many people want to live next to protected wilderness lands, and this has caused real estate prices around the river to soar.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 5, Jan 2007, p24-27, il, map Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
28093
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former Durham District Court Judge Richard Chaney’s conduct has raised concerns about his relationships with the young women he mentors. The former judge mentored troubled teens serving as a truancy court judge in for middle and high school students. School administrators in two schools reported that they were concerned about Chaney’s relationships with teenage girls. A 15-year old girl who was living alone with Chaney also reported an assault from his house. Chaney has not been charged with any crimes and the lack of prosecution has raised questions for many.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 3, January 2008, p7 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
28138
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham City Council recently restored funding to arts groups which had been absent in its preliminary budget. The victory is given to supporters who lobbied to maintain funding that goes to local cultural organizations. The poor economy was one reason the cuts were proposed, but supporters also discuss the negative impact the lack of a policy to support groups has on funding. Currently, there is no department to oversee arts funding in Durham.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 24, June 2008, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28136
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood revival is underway but it may force out some of the neighborhood’s longtime residents. The neighborhood is historic and in need of restoration, but it is being led by mostly white young professionals. The neighborhood is nearly two-thirds black and most residents are renters and are poor. There are social implications to restoring the neighborhood as the restoration may force longtime residents out who cannot afford to remodel their properties or deal with the rising home values and rents.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 20, May 2008, p14-17 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
28150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham resident Erick Daniels was wrongly convicted of robbery and spent seven years in prison before his recent exoneration. Daniels was wrongly convicted of robbing a police department employee when he was fifteen years old. The case has exposed poor investigative standards by the Durham police department and local prosecutors. The case has also tarnished Durham’s justice system.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 39, September 2008, p15-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
28253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Erick Daniels is serving a ten-year prison sentence for an alleged armed robbery, but there is doubt about his involvement. Several sources indicate that another man attempted to confess to the crime for which Daniels was convicted. The sources, including Daniel’s attorney, his mother, another suspect in the case, and the woman who was robbed all talk about Samuel Strong’s potential involvement. Strong fits the description of the person who committed the robbery and is currently serving time for bank robbing.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 21, May 2007, p21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28252
Author(s):
Abstract:
Erick Daniels was sent to prison based on the shape of his eyebrows. Daniels is serving a ten year sentence for allegedly robbing Ruth Brown using a firearm. Daniels has maintained his innocence and there is much evidence to support his claims and more than enough evidence to constitute reasonable doubt. The questionable handling and investigation of Daniels case is detailed, along with interviews by Daniels, his mother, lawyers, and others familiar with the case.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 21, May 2007, p16-23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28300
Author(s):
Abstract:
Student activists from Student Action with Farmworkers work on migrant’s behalf in the fields and at the statehouse. The Durham non-profit brings college students together with farmworkers through a 10-week summer internship program. The interns work with advocacy groups to help migrants gain access to health clinics, teach them about the dangers of pesticides, and promote safety in the fields. Others assist migrants with union organizing, teach migrants about their legal rights, or lobby for statewide policy changes on farmworker and immigrant issues.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 33, August 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28315
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East End Connector in Durham may speed up a trip between the city and Raleigh, but it will tear a neighborhood apart. At least 24 households, seven businesses, a public park, and two churches will be paved over to construct the roadway. Some residents are looking forward to the new change, but other residents fear about what the construction will do to surrounding neighborhoods and whether they will be fairly compensated. A comparison between this project and the project that affected the Hayti neighborhood in Durham is also made. Both projects were done in the name of progress.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 38, September 2007, p20-25 Periodical Website
Record #:
28353
Author(s):
Abstract:
Al McSurley is the winner of a 2007 Indy Citizen Award. McSurely is the Legal Redress Chair of the NC NAACP and works to fight racism using the law. The Chapel Hill resident operated a civil rights law practice prior to his retirement and was known for taking cases that nobody wanted. McSurely is unusual as a white lawyer who works almost exclusively with the civil rights movement, but his work is his way of seeing justice and equality become a reality.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 47, November 2007, p20 Periodical Website
Record #:
28346
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham’s Kenneth Maready is facing a fifty-year sentence for killing a woman while driving under the influence. Maready’s story highlights the need for mental health services, but the inability of the poor to pay for them. Prison is often the only resort for people who suffer from mental illness and the only place they can receive limited treatment. Maready discusses his history of mental illness, substance abuse, suicide attempts, family life, and prison sentences.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 45, November 2007, p15-21 Periodical Website
Record #:
28356
Author(s):
Abstract:
Griffin Todd details how his experiences working a contracting job repairing concrete sidewalks at East Carolina University reflect the racial bias in public projects. Todd and other black contractors cite a culture of racism in the construction industry which is often played out through complex contract negotiations. This prevents authorities from stepping in and taking action. Todd and others discuss how larger contractors who hire their smaller firms often target them to make up for lost costs and how the state’s university system should better monitor the big firms who are taking advantage of them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 50, December 2007, p5-7 Periodical Website