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11 results for Neighborhood--Durham
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Record #:
2268
Author(s):
Abstract:
To clean up their communities, neighbors in East Durham have joined forces with the Durham police. The program, Partners Against Crime, includes community policing, property redevelopment, and citizen involvement to help improve their neighborhoods.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 17, Apr 1995, p12-13, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3993
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1995, when three residents in the Old West Durham neighborhood began racially intimidating some others, over 50 citizens organized the Old West Durham Neighborhood Association to deal with it. The three are now gone, and the association takes pride in its achievement of diversity, harmony, and community. The INDEPENDENT awarded the group a 1998 Citizen Award.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 46, Nov 1998, p15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
27229
Author(s):
Abstract:
Neighborhoods near North Carolina Central University in Durham need cleaning up. Many properties in this campus-adjacent area have unresolved housing-code violations, and the crime is not limited to prostitution, break-ins, and drug use. While the University owns several vacant lots in the area, there aren’t sufficient funds to clean up the area surrounding campus.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 29, July 2016, p8-9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27658
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham’s Lakewood Shopping Center is seeing a new store arrive and possibly, the start of some growth. The Scrap Exchange is a reuse, art and creative center which sells items to artists that might normally go to the garbage dump. With its arrival, hope for the revitalization of the neighborhood and shopping center is high as many think the business and its customers will attract others.
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Record #:
27801
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the first article in a series about the economic, political, and social issues facing the Rolling Hills/Southside neighborhoods in Durham. The neighborhoods have been neglected for decades by the city and investors. There is a proposed plan to renovate the neighborhoods at the cost of $48 million dollars. City officials say the plan is socially complex and financially risky and residents are wary to trust the city after failed promises.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 18, May 2011, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28068
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ray Eurquhart is the winner of a 2009 Indy Citizen Award for improving his community. Eurquhart is a Durham resident and community activist who is working to clean up crime, replenish affordable housing, and restore life to the Rolling Hills and Southside neighborhoods of Durham. Known as “Brother Ray,” Eurquhart helped found the Southside Community Outreach Center, applies for grants for the neighborhood association, created summer programs for schoolchildren in the neighborhood, and more to help the struggling community.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 47, November 2009, p19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28136
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood revival is underway but it may force out some of the neighborhood’s longtime residents. The neighborhood is historic and in need of restoration, but it is being led by mostly white young professionals. The neighborhood is nearly two-thirds black and most residents are renters and are poor. There are social implications to restoring the neighborhood as the restoration may force longtime residents out who cannot afford to remodel their properties or deal with the rising home values and rents.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 20, May 2008, p14-17 Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
28303
Abstract:
Dianne Pledger is leading renewed growth and spirit in the historical Hayti neighborhood in Durham. Pledger is head of the nonprofit St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation and is using history, art, blues music, and new programs like slam poetry to connect the neighborhood with Durham’s broader community. The history of the neighborhood as a once-thriving community of African-American owned businesses and culture is detailed. Pledger’s tireless work rebuilding the community through the foundation is also detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 36, September 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28304
Author(s):
Abstract:
A collection of photographs of the historic Hayti neighborhood in Durham show its cultural and business life along Pettigrew and Fayetteville streets before urban renewal caused much of it to disappear. Photos show the Regal Theater, R.S. McGhee Coal Co., the Bull City Barber Shop, St. Joseph’s A.M.E Church, and views of the main streets.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 36, September 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28257
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Lakewood YMCA in southwest-central Durham is in danger of closing due to poor finances and infrastructure problems. Many in the community are upset because of center’s stabilizing place in the inner-city neighborhood and will take the next three months to try to solve the problem. The center is governed by Raleigh’s YMCA and many believe that the management does not understand the situation in Durham.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 24, June 2007, p5-6 Periodical Website
Record #:
28349
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Committee to Save the Lakewood Y in Durham is the winner of a 2007 Indy Citizen Award. When plans were announced that the branch of the YMCA would be closed due to financial problems, the neighborhood residents took action. The branch is an inclusive place where socio-economic status and race never mattered and has been a staple of the local community. The committee is concerned that losing the YMCA and its programs will have a negative effect of the neighborhood and could lead to a decline in this inner-city neighborhood.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 47, November 2007, p15 Periodical Website