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22 results for Mental health services
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Record #:
2564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The earliest treatment of mental illness was to lock up the victims. As understanding grew, the state provided leadership. Now local government is looked to for leadership in providing solutions.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 61 Issue 1, Summer 1995, p18-42, il, por, f
Record #:
4431
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 1999 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 5, Dec 1999, p1-11, f
Record #:
4900
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 2000 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services, including appropriations, federal block grants, and children's services.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 6, Sept 2000, p1-15, f
Record #:
5295
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 2001 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services. An Act to Phase In Implementation of Mental Health System Reform at the State and Local Level, which will affect administration and delivery services, was an important piece of legislation, as was the Appropriations Act.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 7, Mar 2002, p1-16
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Record #:
7083
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 2004 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services. Legislative enactments affect areas including community alternatives programs, substance abuse services for persons convicted of driving while impaired, and criminal records checks.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 9, Dec 2004, p1-8
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Record #:
7084
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 2003 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services. Legislative enactments included statutes governing the confidentiality of client information and laws affecting the licensure of substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services and facilities.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 8, Sept 2003, p1-12
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Record #:
7086
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 1997 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services. Legislative enactments include reorganization of the Department of Health and Human Services, welfare reform, confidentiality, and the open meetings law.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 3, Oct 1997, p1-16, f
Record #:
7085
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 1995 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services. Legislative enactments include changes in the Willie M. program, court-ordered treatment, and domiciliary care facilities.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 1, Oct 1995, p1-13, f
Record #:
9093
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 1998 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services. Legislative enactments include appropriations, the Psychotherapy Sexual Exploitations Act, juvenile justice reform, and children with special needs.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1998, p1-13
Record #:
9094
Author(s):
Abstract:
Botts discusses legislation enacted by the 2006 North Carolina General Assembly that affects substance abuse, developmental disabilities, and mental health services, with particular attention given to legislation affecting publicly funded services.
Source:
Mental Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7491 I5 M43), Vol. Issue 10, Nov 2006, p1-15
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Record #:
12790
Author(s):
Abstract:
Previously an insurance salesmen from Chapel Hill, John Wesley Umstead, Jr. shifted trades after the loss of a son in 1944, becoming one of the most influential people of North Carolina in the field of mental health. Appointed to the State Hospitals Board of Control, as overseer of mental hospitals in 1945, Umstead is noted as being responsible for the emergence of North Carolina as one of the premier locations for the treatment of mental health problems nationwide.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 30 Issue 25, May 1963, p9-10, por
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Record #:
17851
Author(s):
Abstract:
The General Assembly consolidated several capacities of the Department of Public Health and Welfare in 1963 to form the Department of Mental Health. Under the leadership of Dr. Eugene Hargrove, three divisions run by a Deputy Commissioner were created; the Division of Mental Retardation, the Division of Mental hospitals, and the Division of Community Mental Health Services. Through these divisions specific programs focused on research, alcohol rehabilitation, and mentally disabled children.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 31 Issue 7, May 1965, p14-15, 20, il
Record #:
18505
Abstract:
Early intervention refers to community-based programs across the state devoted to education and treatment of emotionally disturbed youth. These programs began in 1975 after the General Assembly approved $1.2 million in support. In 1981, there were programs in 21 counties offering consultation, education, and even treatment to prevent emotionally disturbed children from maturing into emotionally disturbed adults.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Fall 1981, p14-16
Record #:
18504
Abstract:
In 1981, the state had 41 community mental health centers providing a range of services from education to treatment for children to adults. Community center success grew from better understanding of mental health issues and aimed to serve individuals on a local level rather than state level. The article reviews both successes and obstacles of the community mental health program.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Fall 1981, p10-13
Record #:
18894
Abstract:
The state offers citizens with mental health, developmental disabilities, and substance abuse problems a variety of treatment options through 15 different facilities. It is estimated that 14 percent of the state's population requires one form or another of these services. Of the fifteen facilities are four psychiatric hospitals, three developmental centers, three neuro-medical centers, three alcohol and drug abuse treatment centers, and two residential facilities for children with severe emotional/behavioral disorders. The article looks at these facilities and the number of citizens using services offered by the same.
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