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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Construction industry
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Record #:
918
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Holland, Chairman and CEO of Charlotte-based United Dominion, which provides industrial products and engineering and construction services, discusses how his company has coped with the recession.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Jan 1993, p10-13, por
Record #:
1169
Author(s):
Abstract:
With few office towers, industrial plants and large shopping centers on the drawing board or under construction, the nonprofit sector has become the focal point of the state's building industry. Four out of the 10 largest projects in the state involve nonprofit organizations.
Subject(s):
Record #:
2473
Abstract:
In 1995, commercial and industrial construction are among the state's twenty largest projects. They include Raleigh's Crabtree Valley Mall expansion ($100 million) and Wilmington's Corning Plant expansion ($150 million).
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Sept 1995, p46-49,51,53,55-56,58, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3252
Abstract:
In 1996, commercial and industrial construction were among the state's twenty largest projects. They included Charlotte's 201 North Tryon office tower ($116 million) and Duke University Medical Center expansion ($88 million).
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Subject(s):
Record #:
4445
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1999, construction companies did not lack for projects statewide. However, the state's low unemployment level (3.2 percent in October 1999) caused many companies to have project backlogs because there were not enough workers. This worker shortage lengthened many job completions by 10 to 20 percent. Many companies are offering incentives to hourly workers, like health insurance and 401(k)s.
Record #:
4547
Author(s):
Abstract:
Contractors do not lack projects in North Carolina. What they lack is a timely supply of building materials. Nationwide, a nine-year economic expansion and a heavy demand for new construction help suppliers' keep plants running at their maximum and beyond. Even with supply difficulties, the state's top thirty contractors saw revenues increase 4 percent to around $3.3 billion in 1999.
Source:
Record #:
11043
Abstract:
When the Roxboro Cotton Mills planned an expansion in 1919, they chose the John W. Ferguson Company of New York and New Jersey. The company sent George W. Kane to do the job. When he finished the work, citizens of Roxboro prevailed on him to remain with his family and start his own business. Kane did. Today, George W. Kane, Inc., started in 1920, is the state's fourth largest building contractor and 303rd largest in the nation. The Winston-Salem campus of Wake Forest University was built largely by the Kane corporation.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 12, Dec 1970, p28-30, 52, il, por
Record #:
11196
Abstract:
R. Dillard Teer is senior vice-president of the worldwide road building and construction that bears his father's name, Nello Teer Company. He is also executive vice-president of the Durham and Southern Railway and has served twenty-three years as chairman of the Raleigh-Durham Airport Authority. Teer is featured in this month's WE THE PEOPLE MAGAZINE's North Carolina Businessman in the News.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 7, July 1973, p13-15, 17-18, por
Record #:
11825
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jobs for construction companies are becoming more competitive. Where two or three might have been in competition in the past, it is not unusual to have a dozen or more competing for the same job due to current economic conditions. Revenues rank the top twenty-five contractors in the state. Barnhill Contracting Company in Tarboro ranked first with $522 million in revenues.
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Record #:
12375
Abstract:
This article provides a brief overview of the state's building industry, concentrating primarily on commercial, industrial and institutional construction. Sketches of the half-dozen North Carolina-based companies ranked among the country's top 400 construction firms by Engineering News-Record are included.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Sept 1984, p14-16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26-27, 58, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
12926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gennett reports on the construction industry in the Carolinas where over 3,500 firms hire six percent of the workforce.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Aug 1988, p32-34, 51-52, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
13141
Abstract:
There are many examples in North Carolina of nontraditional industries. The best example is North Carolina's rapid rise as a producer electronic equipment. Also, North Carolina's branch of the Associated General Contractors of America is the largest of its kind in the United States. North Carolina is a leader in railroads and motor carriers as well.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 16, Dec 1955, p19-21, f
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Record #:
13212
Author(s):
Abstract:
Manufacturers of pre-cast, pre-stressed concrete products for the construction industry, Concrete Materials Inc., of Charlotte, North Carolina, brings new industry to the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 12, Nov 1954, p15, 21, il
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Record #:
14869
Author(s):
Abstract:
While many developers, local officials, and chambers of commerce worry about the construction market overheating, the boom continues around the state. Adams examines construction in the state's three largest markets which account for over half of the projects reported - Raleigh/Durham Research Triangle, Charlotte/Mecklenburg, and the Piedmont Triad of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p41-42, 44-45, 47, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
14870
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA profiles four key players in the state's construction industry - J. M. Dixon Inc.; Jones Group Inc.; G. Smedes York; and Henry Faison.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p50-51, 53-54, 56-58, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):