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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Corkran, David H
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Record #:
18688
Author(s):
Abstract:
Corkran presents a reproduction of Alexander Long's original postscript concerning the manners and customs of the Cherokees Indians of the southeastern United States.
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Record #:
20658
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article gives an account of a conflict between some members of the Cherokee tribe and the Stecoe settlement, located in Swain County. Some background information on Cherokee relations in this area at the time are included, as well as an account of the fallout of the conflict.
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Record #:
20749
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Abstract:
This article presents evidence of Cherokee migration from the North along with details about the Cherokee people that can be surmised based upon this evidence. Also examined is the development of the nation after settlement, and the impact of that development on the historic Cherokees.
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Record #:
29104
Author(s):
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A fragment of the Cherokee migration story presented to Alexander Long in 1717 is provided and then analyzed. The story’s explanation of the Cherokee migration seems unlikely from a contemporary perspective because of claims about their ancient writing system, their diet, and a migration pattern from east to west. All of these seem unlikely for various reasons, but the author focuses on the migration pattern. However, when considered the geography in the tale from a different perspective, this could be an account of an Indian crossing from Northeast Asia into northwestern North America.
Record #:
29106
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Abstract:
The article looks to disprove the idea that Cherokee religious beliefs descended from Mayan or Aztec beliefs. The Cherokee’s belief in the Supreme Being and their high god concept has greater parallels with American Indian tribes of North America and is possibly derived from Asiatic patterns of belief. The Supreme Being and its characteristics are compared with modern Western gods, Mexican tribe’s gods, and ancient Asian people’s gods. Color, dress, ornamentation, symbolism, fertility, and politics, are all discussed in relation to the Supreme Being and his influence on Cherokee religion.
Record #:
29109
Author(s):
Abstract:
The parallels between cultures of American Indians groups and native Asian peoples are highlighted through shared religious mythology and related linguistic patterns. The importance of the serpent and turtle as symbols in both cultures are discussed in depth along with the Flood myth or archetype. Also discussed are the consonant sounds present in the words water and serpent and their presence in the languages of Asiatic peoples and American Indians. One group highlighted in connection to the Asiatic cultures is the Cherokee of the Eastern United States.
Record #:
29105
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cherokee peoples’ religious views of fire and the sun are analyzed. The article uses the observations of Cherokee religious practices observed and written by Alexander Longe in 1725, James Adair in 1775, and John Howard Payne and Dr. Samuel Butrick between 1825 and 1840. The observations discuss the fire and sun cults within Cherokee religious practices.