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20 results for The Laurel of Asheville Vol. 13 Issue 6, June 2017
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29846
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Mountain Springs Cabins is a secluded get-away in Candler, North Carolina, where visitors receive a relaxed vacation in which both nature and nurture play leading roles. Deaf since childhood, Sara Peltier created and ran the cabin rental business for twenty-four years. Her daughter, Kate King, continues Peltier’s legacy and plans to expand the property by adding tree houses, dog accommodations, and recreation areas.
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29840
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Spruce Pine Artist Debra Carpenter began to use painting as a form of self-directed therapy to cope with the death of her son in 2002. Of all the paintings displayed in her home studio for the Toe River Arts Council Tour, two are not for sale. The Scream and The Healing both represent the beginning and the ending of her grief, which continues to find its expression in portrayals of whimsical nightmarish paintings.
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29844
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Nutritionists in Asheville, North Carolina are teaching people how to forage for edible foods in the wild. Wild Abundance, a wild food, homesteading and primitive skills school, says better nutrition comes from eating wild produce, mushrooms, plants and weeds. The process of foraging develops independence and increases flexibility and variety.
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29845
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The centennial celebration of Biltmore Industries will take place at Grovewood Village in Asheville on June 17, 2017. Today, the six English-style cottages remain in use with artists’ galleries like the woodcrafters and weavers that once made a living in the same location. The celebration features a special exhibition of fiber art by seven regional weavers, artist demonstrations, guided history tours, a cake cutting ceremony, and a historical presentation.
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29843
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The Black Mountain Center for the Arts is ushering in its eleventh annual Art in Bloom, a flower-filled festival that will take place in mid-June, followed by an exhibit of plein air paintings. This multi-faceted event includes two different gallery shows, a display of floral arrangements, a gala and a garden tour.
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29842
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Black Mountain, North Carolina has a longstanding tradition of being at the forefront of the arts. Visitors go to this small town to tour working art studios and galleries, as well as to experience its scenic nature. Black Mountain is framed by the Seven Sisters, the range of seven mountains ascending to Graybeard Mountain.
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29841
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The southern Appalachian region claims a rich history of ceramics and Western North Carolina is home to some of the woodfire field’s top artists and a number of young artists leading the field in new directions. Throughout June, the Asheville Area Arts Council presents an exhibition of works which demonstrate how potters influence each other’s art as they work together.
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29847
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Protecting birds means protecting the natural environment, which also protects the long-term quality of human life. The University of North Carolina at Asheville recently delayed construction of its new student housing out of respect for a nesting Great Horned Owl family near the Botanical Gardens.
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29856
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Go Yarok!, an initiative of the Asheville Jewish Community Center (JCC), seeks to connect people of all ages and backgrounds to permaculture, Jewish traditions and spirituality. The program offers adults the chance to take part in educational activities, contribute to the JCC garden, visit local farms and volunteer for environmental service projects in the community.
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29855
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Pamela Zimmerman continues her family tradition of growing berries by running Zimmerman’s Berry Farm in Marshall, North Carolina. Zimmerman likes to be transparent about the growing process and aims to connect people to their food, farms and agricultural heritage. Each summer, Zimmerman’s Berry Farm participates in the Farm Tour organized by Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project.
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29854
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Thousands of plant species exist in Western North Carolina, and it can become difficult for gardeners to remember all the plant names. Garden designer Nancy Duffy created a smart phone and computer application that gives gardeners the ability to tag plants and keep organized digital records for their garden. The Muddy Boots Plant Tags are also being used in a series of garden tours hosted by Bullington Gardens of Hendersonville.
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29850
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Toe River Arts Council (TRAC) presents The Interbeing Project, the Interface of Woman and Nature, a photography exhibit by Bonnie Cooper. The exhibition reveals female nudes composited with representations of nature, creating a merger and relationship between the two. Cooper hopes that viewers will experience the exhibit as a celebration of woman’s natural beauty as well as the beauty of the natural world.
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29849
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Botanists are attempting to refine the classification of twenty species of native azaleas, which all fall under the scientific genus name of Rhododendron. As their research continues, people can learn about azaleas at the North Carolina Arboretum. The arboretum is home to the National Native Azalea Repository of azaleas representing nearly every species native to the United States, along with many natural hybrids and selections.
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29848
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The Appalachian Mountains house a rich diversity of fungi, some of which produce abundant fruits that are naturally healthy and delicious. No Place Like Home, an Asheville-based tour company, offers guided hikes teaching people how to identify and harvest edible wild plants and mushrooms. Local mushroom clubs and mycological suppliers, such as Asheville Fungi, help people cultivate a variety of mushrooms at home.
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29851
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Asheville School was founded in 1900 as a college preparatory school for boys. Today, the co-educational high school for boarding and day students offers a challenging curriculum in humanities, mathematics, science, foreign language and fine arts. Students are also required to participate in community service projects, and have opportunities to engage with area artists and outdoor recreationists.
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