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10 results for Mushrooms
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Record #:
8946
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The morel is the first mushroom that grows in the spring. From a distance, they look like pine cones and grow most abundantly in Michigan, Ohio, and Kentucky. There is still no effective way to guarantee morels will grow in the same place year and after year, and therefore commercially growing the mushrooms has proven impossible. They can be found in apple orchards and woods, and the best time to search for them is after a warm spring rain.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 12, May 1980, p16-18, 65, il
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Record #:
13939
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Inserra discusses foraging for wild, edible mushrooms, the health benefits of mushrooms, and the Foolproof Four. This particular group is easily identified, does not have poisonous lookalikes, and taste delicious.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 13, Mar 2011, p22-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24571
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The morel is a mushroom that shows up in North Carolina for only two weeks in spring. The author discusses searching for and harvesting this highly sought-after mushroom.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 22, April 1972, p11-12, il
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Record #:
6053
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North Carolina is home to more varieties of mushrooms than any other state. The abundance occurs because of the great diversity of natural habitats, ranging from the highlands' Canadian-like vegetation to near-tropical vegetation in the southeast coastal area. Coulborne describes some of the varieties.
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Record #:
9780
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There are more species of mushrooms found in the North Carolina mountains then in any place of comparable size on earth. This abundance occurs because of the great diversity of natural habitats. Ellis describes and photographs a number of them.
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Record #:
8140
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Joyner describes North Carolina's five fall mushrooms: the puffball, jack-o'-lantern, oyster, honey, and stinkhorn.
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Record #:
29848
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The Appalachian Mountains house a rich diversity of fungi, some of which produce abundant fruits that are naturally healthy and delicious. No Place Like Home, an Asheville-based tour company, offers guided hikes teaching people how to identify and harvest edible wild plants and mushrooms. Local mushroom clubs and mycological suppliers, such as Asheville Fungi, help people cultivate a variety of mushrooms at home.
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Record #:
29908
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Western North Carolina is known for its biological diversity and plentiful wild mushrooms. The Asheville Mushroom Club invites the public to celebrate FungiFest on September 2, 2017, in Swannanoa, North Carolina. A full day of guided hikes, classes with experts, fresh displays from local foraging excursions and identification assistance will be offered by skilled club members.
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Record #:
31053
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There is a rising interest among North Carolina farmers in growing shiitake and other edible mushrooms to supplement income, and to promote its health benefits. Although most mushrooms are non-poisonous, North Carolina hosts several species that potentially could cause death if eaten. This article discusses how to identify and grow mushrooms, as well as where to buy fresh mushrooms, and mushroom nutrition.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 9, Sept 2007, p12-13, il, por
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Record #:
36553
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Perhaps fabulous about fungus is their present status in the realm of biology. Long considered as a plant, recent research has concluded them to be more closely related to animals. More information about the living thing classified in its own kingdom can be found in the author’s description of fungal anatomy, an activity called spore printing, and a local mushroom club.