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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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22 results for Ellis, Harry
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Record #:
9753
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Each year millions of monarch butterflies pass through the state on an incredible roundtrip from Canada to Mexico and back. Ellis describes the monarch's life cycle and journey.
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9936
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Lichens are primitive, colorful, common, and useful. Ellis describes the ones that do not cling to rocks.
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9549
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There are more different species of salamanders living in western North Carolina than anywhere else in the world. Among them are the long-tailed, red-cheeked, two-lined, Blue Ridge spring, and red-backed salamander.
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Record #:
6073
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The North Carolina mountains are home to many colorful and interesting snakes. Most are harmless, non-poisonous ones and include the eastern garter snake, milk snake, and eastern hognose snake. There are only two poisonous species found in the mountains. These are the timber rattler and the copperhead.
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Record #:
9780
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There are more species of mushrooms found in the North Carolina mountains then in any place of comparable size on earth. This abundance occurs because of the great diversity of natural habitats. Ellis describes and photographs a number of them.
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Record #:
9783
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The mountains ranges of the Southern Appalachians, Great Smokies, and Blue Ridge contain one of the richest floral gardens on the planet. Over 1,400 species of wildflowers have been recorded there. Ellis photographs and describes some of them.
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Record #:
8729
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Ferns look fragile, but they are among the earth's oldest plants, dating back 300 million years to the Carboniferous Age. Unlike flowering plants, that may have many thousands of different kinds, there are less than 400 species of ferns on the American continent north of Mexico. In North Carolina ferns occur throughout the state, but it is in the mountains where ferns are found in large numbers of species and in abundance of individuals. Ellis identifies ferns common to North Carolina, including fiddleheads, cinnamon, climbing, walking, and mountain spleenwort.
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Record #:
9970
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Many species of beetles share the state with people and animals. Ellis describes some of the more interesting ones. There are far more good beetles than bad; less than one percent of them are harmful to humans and crops.
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Record #:
9971
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Ellis describes how insects use camouflage, imitation, and deception to fool predators.
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Record #:
9976
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Ellis describes a number of insects whose buzzing choruses are heard in the late summer and explains how they make them.
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Record #:
165
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Long admired for its dazzling display of rhododendron, Roan Mountain is also a magnificent garden of rare plants left over from the last Ice Age.
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Record #:
424
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Slime mold, formally known as Leo carpus fragilis, is a common species of mold found in damp, shady woodlands in North Carolina.
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Record #:
679
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A woodland pond is a study in diverse ecosystems.
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Record #:
1645
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Only the tropics have more species of and individual centipedes and millipedes than the area of the southern Appalachians that includes the Great Smokies and the Blue Ridge.
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Record #:
1773
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The 4,000 miles of mountain streams in North Carolina provide the habitat for a broad and fascinating assortment of creatures and plant life.
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