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7 results for Millipedes
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Record #:
4156
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Millipedes have lived in what is now North Carolina for millions of years. Ancient mountain ranges gave rise to a large number of species. Today over 100 species of the colorful creature still reside in the Appalachians. While bright colors make them attractive to predators, millipedes produce foul- tasting chemicals that make them unpalatable to their enemies.
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Record #:
25838
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Dr. Jason Bond, professor of biology at East Carolina, has just received three National Science Foundation grants to study spiders and millipedes. The research will focus on cataloging species from around the world, examining biodiversity and evolutionary biology with the aid of undergraduate and graduate students.
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Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2006, p27 Periodical Website
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Record #:
1645
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Only the tropics have more species of and individual centipedes and millipedes than the area of the southern Appalachians that includes the Great Smokies and the Blue Ridge.
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Record #:
2891
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Dr. Rowland Shelley, Curator of Invertebrates at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science, is one of the world's leading experts on millipedes and centipedes.
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Record #:
10178
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Joyner discusses some of the unique qualities and habits of the millipedes that inhabit North Carolina.
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Record #:
30135
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The milliped species, Pseudotremia fracta, occurs in leaf litter in the spruce-fir forest of the Great Smoky Mountains, as well as in limestone caves along the Cinch River. Extended ranges of this species have been observed in the Nantahala River gorge, North Carolina and other mountain areas. This study examines the taxonomic status, distribution and subspecies of this millipede.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 5, July 1981, p135-144, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30140
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The millipedes of the Kings Mountain region of southern North Carolina were sampled to determine seasonal variation in faunal composition. Three species are unique to the Kings Mountain region, but this region also shares eight species with the eastern Piedmont and five with the Appalachian Mountains.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1980, p1-42, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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